MotorcycleDaily.com – Motorcycle News, Editorials, Product Reviews and Bike Reviews

Motorcycle News, Editorials, Product Reviews and Bike Reviews

Triumph Will Release New Tiger for 2007

Triumph will release an all new version of it’s popular Tiger three-cylinder ‘trailie’ (as the British would call it) for 2007. The new Tiger will be powered by a version of Triumph’s newest 1050cc inline triple, replacing the previous model’s 955cc three-cylinder powerplant.

Although details are sparse at this time, the 2007 Tiger also features what appears to be an aluminum perimeter frame (the old bike used tubular steel) with new 43mm USD forks suspending the front wheel, which has gone from the old bike’s 19-inch to a more typical 17-inch diameter.

Slowing that front wheel are twin Nissin 4-piston calipers, which are radial-mounted and clamp 320mm rotors. Yes, you heard that right – the new Tiger uses radial-mounted front calipers, a feature more often found on the latest sportbikes than in the Tiger’s more sedate class. The serious braking hardware, along with the aluminum chassis, beefy sportbike-style braced aluminum swingarm, 17-inch front wheel (which will allow owners to fit the latest sport tires) and USD forks, seem to indicate that Triumph is pointing the new Tiger in a much more aggressively sporty direction than its predecessor.

And then there’s the new motor. The 1050cc mill’s 95cc displacement increase is accomplished entirely by means of a lengthened stroke (71.4mm, a significant increase from the 955′s 65mm), with the new 1050 sharing the 955′s 79mm bore. The increased stroke should bring a significant increase in low-end and midrange power and torque production, making the new motor not only faster than the 955, but more flexible. US specifications are not yet available, but the European spec sheet claims 115PS(113.2HP)@9400rpm, and 100Nm(74lb-ft) of torque @6,250rpm. While these figures don’t seem like much of an increase over the old 955-powered Tiger’s 105hp@8,900rpm and 71 lb-ft@5,700rpm, we suspect that the change in character of the new engine will be much more prominent (and enjoyable) in action than the numbers alone suggest.

Keep your eye on Motorcycle Daily for more news on the 2007 models as we receive it.