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Yamaha Introduces FZ8 and Fazer8 to Europe (Full Specs)

After months of teasing, Yamaha Europe has finally revealed full specifications and photos of it’s new 779cc inline four nakeds, the FZ8 and Fazer8. The Fazer8 features a mini fairing, but is otherwise technically identical to the FZ8 (although a few pounds heavier).

Each of the new models is available in three colors, including white, black and blue. Although Yamaha describes the 779cc mill as “all new”, it appears to be a sleeved down FZ1 motor, because it shares the same stroke.

The narrower bore requires modification to the cylinders, of course, but Yamaha points out that the crank and head are new designs as well. Yamaha describes the power delivery as very strong down low coupled with a solid pull on top. Effectively a “long stroke” motor, both bikes should present very flexible performance and very usable road power.

Wet weights are claimed at 465 pounds for the FZ8 and 484 pounds for the Fazer8. Not lightweights, and perhaps reflecting shared frame and componentry with the larger FZ1 models.

The bikes will be plenty fast. Yamaha is claiming 106 horsepower at 10,000 RPM together with a very flat and healthy torque curve. You can view the full specifications for the FZ8 here.

It is possible that these two bikes will be available in the U.S. as 2011 models, but we have heard nothing from Yamaha in this regard. We do not expect Yamaha to anounce any additional 2010 models for the United States market.

The bikes could be alot of fun. Even with shared componentry, and similar weights to the FZ1, the crank weight should be significantly lighter…lending a more nimble, playful attitude to the 779cc machines.

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MD Readers Respond:

  • It amazes me that people are complaining about motorcycles that are not pushing the performance envelope. True a 2010 Accord is faster to sixty than a 94 corvette. We have exceeded the skills of 99.9 percent of riders. People have forgotten the joy of riding. There is more to life than the fastest lap. Enjoy the ride.
  • Actually, I’m still waiting to see which of the Japanese companies take up the golden opportunity they are all missing.I realize that the Japanese factories are very traditional in terms of engine layouts, but they’ve copied and or implemented just about every configuration out there. And of course, Yamaha has plenty of history in regard to what I’m about to configuration I’m about to suggest.It’s simple. If any of the big four were to take one of their 1000cc fours and ‘downsize’ to a 750 triple, they would end up with a bike narrower, more powerful, and torquier than the modern 600 fours (supersport, naked, etc). Even somewhat detuned (but then again, geared down), these bikes would be great street bikes. Aside from new castings, some engineering, and retooling (not insubstantial), but the basic motor engineering is all done.

    In fact, I would rather buy a CBR750RR triple based on 3/4ths of a CBR1000RR (which I own) than a CBR600RR, and it would be as light if not lighter than the current best in class 600RR.

    My two cents. While we’re at it, why doesn’t someone build a 750 Parallel Twin with the attention to lightness and detail that the modern super sports get?

  • Heavy, fancy and probably pricey, as others say – rather disappointing. N/A riders have nothing to envy to Europeans.
    My 2003 Honda 919 is lighter and as poverfull with lower compression ratio for better choices of fuel.
  • There are already too many bikes in the garage, so I’m not in the market right now. The Fazer * pushes a LOT of the right buttons for me. If it comes to the U.S.A. with a decent price point, and optional factory hard bags, it could well be my next new bike. With the VFR 800 gone, and the F800ST a bit down on hp, this would be an excellent mid-size Sport-Tourer.
  • My reaction is a big Yawn… Come on Yamaha I know that product lead times mean that you have to guess years ahead as far as what you are going to build but at what point in time did this bike seem like a good idea? Someone already said it. Same bike, less power. Is there something about the FZ1 styling that you think is “iconic”? Allow me to burst your bubble. It’s not. Oh sure it’s a good (but not great) product but I don’t think it’s crying out for a full range of models. Instead of “more of less” how about “more of different”. You’ve got lots of nice Euro only bikes that we’d love over here.. Yeah yeah I know. THE MARKET THE MARKET!!!!! Well the market is going to send this one back I think. Better luck next time. Just saying.
  • I was really looking forward to the details on this bike and hoping it would come to America but find myself a bit disappointed. I doubt it will be cheap enough for me to pick it over the FZ1 and at close to 800cc I doubt I would save enough on insurance to purchase it instead of the FZ1. Probably doesn’t matter because it looks too similar to the FZ1 for them to import it anyway.
  • What’s the point of same weight, same components less power?
  • I do have to say I’m a little disappointed with the FZ8. It weighs about the same as my FZ1 and doesn’t really gain anything when compared to what I would expect to be the category contemporaries. The bike lost, the FZ6 had its downfalls next to the bikes it competed with such as the SV650 but this bike fixes those deficiencies while gaining a few to counterbalance it. From a cost cutting standpoint it makes sense since they seem to be sharing platforms however they lost a lot of what made the FZ6 a good bike in the process.
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