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Details Released by Husqvarna on Nuda 900 and 900R

Details have been released regarding the new Husqvarna nakeds, the 900 and 900R. At less than 385 pounds dry weight, and with more than 100 hp and 70 foot/pounds of torque, these should be fun bikes. The “R” model gets higher end brakes and suspension, of course, but both bikes will benefit from Husky accessories, including windscreens and saddlebags. Here is the press release from BMW/Husqvarna:

Husqvarna Motorcycles is proud to unveil the first of a new generation of motorcycles: Nuda 900 and Nuda 900R. These exhilarating new models are the first to combine the history and race pedigree of Husqvarna with the technological innovations and engineering prowess of the BMW Group, and the flair of Italian styling. The results speak for themselves – the Nuda 900 and Nuda 900R – two motorcycles built with soul and passion that is backed up by high performance developed through years of competition experience. The first page in the story of the new Husqvarnas has been turned…

Nuda 900 and Nuda 900R – a taste of things to come

Developed as a crossover model between a supermoto and a naked bike, Husqvarna doesn’t feel the Nuda can be shoehorned into any specific category. It delivers a sporty, dynamic ride where agility is balanced perfectly with performance in a bike with a bold and fresh look. Is it a supermoto? Is it a naked bike? The Nuda is whatever you want it to be, but above all it’s a Husqvarna.

Styling

With the factory situated to the north-west of Milan, Husqvarna’s team of designers draw inspiration from the passion and flair that encapsulates this area of Italy. Inside the ‘Centro Stile’ a specially selected group of talented young designers work tirelessly to create the look that is unique to every Husqvarna, whether it be an on or off-road model.

Despite being minimalist in its design, every panel on the Nuda helps define its athletic body, giving it a sense of dynamic tension that flows the length of the bike and finishes on the tapered tail that mimics the aerodynamics of a sports bike. The exposed trellis frame, high level exhaust and red rocker cover hint at the performance that lies behind the curvy body, while the bike’s unique headlight – its face on the road – glowers intent. Sporty yet elegant, sleek yet purposeful, the Nuda is bold Italian styling at its very finest.

The Nuda 900R proudly displays the company’s distinctive red and white competition colours, made famous through race success, while the Nuda 900 has a more subtle black paint scheme.

Engine

Husqvarna understands that the heart and soul of a motorcycle comes from its engine and so choosing the right motor formed a crucial part of the Nuda project. A joint decision was made with BMW’s engine development team in Munich to use the highly reliable and technologically advanced F 800 R motor as a basis for both the Nuda 900 and Nuda 900R – however it would then be adapted to meet Husqvarna’s specific needs and demands.

Designed to reflect Husqvarna’s sporting pedigree, this new configuration not only delivers a more aggressive racing feel and sound at maximum performance, it also vastly improves the power and torque characteristics of the engine, not to forget the higher capacity of 900cc Husqvarna has increased the power and torque (>100hp and 100Nm) while managing to retain the linear, fluid nature of the power delivery at small throttle openings and low revs.

Finally, to add the Husqvarna stamp to the engine, the rocker box cover is painted red – a feature common to all Husqvarna motorcycles.

Chassis

With its vast racing experience, Husqvarna knows which components to turn to for the ultimate performance and how to extract the maximum from a chassis. To further increase prestige of the Nuda 900R, Husqvarna has equipped its chassis with the very highest specification of components. The 48mm Sachs forks are fully adjustable and the Öhlins shock comes with compression, rebound and spring preload adjustment as well as a ride height adjustor. The Nuda 900R’s suspension is designed to raise the bike’s centre of gravity compared to the Nuda 900, increasing ground clearance and improving the handling to deliver a thrilling and responsive ride.

To create a motorcycle more suited to urban life or touring, the Nuda 900 comes with 48mm Sachs forks and a fully adjustable Sachs monoshock. The suspension is set-up to deliver a smoother ride and make the bike more relaxed and user-friendly while the seat has a double level to provide greater comfort also for the pillion

Husqvarna has made the ergonomics and handling a priority on both models of Nuda and as a result the bike’s fuel tank is located under the seat to allow the weight distribution to be as close to the centre of gravity as possible. This work has created a bike that is both stable at high speed and agile at low speed that delivers a safe and comforting ride whatever the conditions.

This, along with the relaxed and natural riding position, is certain to be appreciated and exploited in full by both beginner and expert riders alike.

While both models have radial brake calipers, in order to further enhance its sporty appeal, the Nuda 900R comes with Brembo monobloc racing brakes with 320mm discs. Constructed out of a single piece of aluminium for maximum feel and power with minimal flex, these twin four-piston radial calipers give the Nuda 900R superior braking power on both the road and track. The Nuda 900 also features Brembo four-piston radial calipers and 320mm discs with sintered pads, delivering powerful, accurate and smooth braking feel whatever the conditions. Both models use the same 240mm disc and Brembo two piston caliper rear brake.

Weight is crucial in making a motorcycle agile and Husqvarna has managed to keep the mass of the Nuda 900 to less than 175kg (dry weight), thanks to clever engineering solutions and compact design.. Both models of Nuda come with a stainless steel exhaust muffler, however the 900R has a carbon fibre clamp, end cap and heat shield.

Accessories

Should owners of the Nuda 900 or Nuda 900R wish to take full advantage of the motorcycle’s all-round ability, or simply want to personalize their machine, Husqvarna has developed a full range of accessories. For example those wishing to take their Nuda touring, either solo or with a pillion, either for a relaxed day loop in your home turf or multiple days with your friends, can perfectly enhance the experience with a high windshield kit and in their size easily adjustable sidebags.

Nuda 900 and Nuda 900R – thrilling riding experience

67 Comments

  1. Gabe says:

    These bikes are cool, but 390 pounds dry? WTF? That means 450 with gas and fluids. That gets a big MEH from me. I’d go with a KTM Super Duke or SM-T.

  2. Gixxerusa says:

    Nice looking tard. Didn’t see any mention about the expected MSRP. It will probably be too expensive since is backed by BMW.

  3. Jeremy in TX says:

    34″ seat height? Well, that is too tall for me, but I’m sure it’s what the motard fans want. Doesn’t look like it holds much gas either. Guess I’ll wait a few months and see if BMW incorporates fome of these improvements into its F800R before I pull the trigger on a Street Triple.

  4. Ayk says:

    Looks to me like they started with the more vertical twin from the 800 GS instead of the R. They stole the GS mirrors for sure. Not sold on the looks, but it’s more appealing than some KTMs out there.

  5. Phil K says:

    The seats on those bikes are what kills the deal for me. If you can last a half hour on ride you qualify as a masochist. :(

  6. Vrooom says:

    Would love to see them do more with this platform, as it’s not practical for Portland except for 3 months out of the year as is. A little larger fairing and this could be a really fun bike, though I probably still couldn’t afford it. Would like to see a dyno to verify those 100 ponies, haven’t seen the F800 get anywhere near that on a dyno.

  7. Steve says:

    Very cool. Add some wind protection and I will buy one.

  8. ziggy says:

    yes this bike rocks indeed

  9. Eric says:

    I like these super-motards.. I sat on a Dorsoduro 1200 last week.. Nice styling, but as usual, was designed for a shorter rider. Oh well.. I’ll keep my DL.. it’s ugly, but it just plain works :-)

  10. BuzzinNH says:

    I would consider if I could buy at the local BMW shop, Husky Dealers are few and far between. I visited one about an hour from my house and the sales people could care less about selling the husky’s, kept hinting I should ake a Duc for a ride even though I was there to look at DIRT bikes… BTW, I tested the 848. I never pass up an opp to ride a Duc.

  11. Auphliam says:

    I like the concept, but the ‘Transformer-esque’ styiling of this and the KTMs just doesn’t appeal to me. Give me some smooth lines.

    • Denny says:

      Smooth lines? C’mon! Now is time for hard lines, real agressive ones. Everything has hard lines nowadays. Smooth lines will arrive at next turn of civilization. ))))

  12. Kjazz says:

    This segment is really starting to heat up. We now have this machine along with the KTMs 690s, 990s etc. The Aprilia Dorsodura (sp?), what else …. ?

  13. Fat Old Man says:

    And you can always use that thing on the front fender as a seat for a third passenger.

  14. Artem says:

    this is pretty cool thing. But the only thing with piston engine I’m ready or willing to
    buy right now is Ford Focus for its price/quality

  15. Samizdat says:

    A lightweight naked bike with hard bags as a factory option? Never thought I’d see the day.

  16. PN says:

    I like it but where could you buy one?

  17. S Calwell says:

    Wow, what a bunch of critics. I ride a F800GS and I can see the advantages in this bike. Lighter, more power, better suspension (do you see the trend here?). Husky is trying to build a better bike and yes it will cost more. But it costs even more to start with a F800something and replace the built to a price components with the really good stuff. I don’t like the looks either but performance over rides esthetics. Now I may not buy the used KTM SMT I have been looking for.

  18. Dannytheman says:

    I have to admit I like the look of this. Very fun looking and clever design!
    I don’t like the way the exhaust wraps under the frame. Seems to placed in prime smash on a rock, or curb location!
    All in all, a nice clean looking model!

  19. W. Carper says:

    Who cares what it looks like…all I would see is the sky above the instrument cluster on this thing anyway. The front tire wouldn’t wear very quickly if you know what I mean. Fun factor would be through the roof on these bikes.

  20. ralph glorioso says:

    My Stone Age Moto-Guzzi is looking better all the time. Why do new sport bikes have to look like insects?

  21. Bob says:

    Seat Height:

    For the base model: 860 mm

    For the R model: 875 mm

    I suppose that this makes sense to someone. After all, the R model should be easier to wheely and stopee.

    Having owned a BMW, I’m not sure that I want one made in Italy. The Chinese BMW was bad enough.

    Personally, I’ll reserve judgement until I see how Gerald Kiska re-styles the Super Duke. Should be released in November. May or may not come to the U.S.

  22. Colby C says:

    I’ve really been looking forward to to the release of this bike. I’m not completely on board with the styling. Was hoping they would either go full dirt bike look, or sport bike styling like some of the teasers that kept showing up earlier in the year. I’m still in, but gonna have to wait till I’ve seen it in person to make a final judgement. I’m still excited. When will it be here, and how much.

  23. uconnapharm says:

    anyplace online listing NUDA specs , in particular – SEAT HEIGHT ?

  24. MikeD says:

    I LIKE IT. The Black Base Model looks like a F-117 Stealth Figther on 2 wheels.
    Im down with the Transformers and Origami look. No wonder i like the KTM RC8R so much.
    Keep it up…dare to be different and NON COOKIE CUTTER.

  25. Jim Huton says:

    Looks like a make over of the KTM Duke 3 style wise. But most that know how to ride will love this bike it will handle and perform like a Husky. This bike is not for novices.

  26. JR says:

    Question.. How many jobs in the United States will be started with the production of this motorcycle?
    Answer.. Zero
    Result.. Don’t buy it.

    • Dave says:

      If this motorcycle sells in the US then it will serve to keep a motorcycle dealership open (they close a lot these days). That’s as good as any motorcycle in America does today. Harley is shrinking at too fast a rate to be considered any different.

    • bentgrill says:

      if there was an american bike that was in any way like this bike i would purchase it. but no. only gigantic cruisers. the freak genius buell doesn’t count.

    • Hornytoad says:

      Exactly, when the us makes it, ill buy it. Harley dumped buell, bought an italian company, while the new buell is considered one of the best bike out. Air cooling and belt drives arent sporty. I know it doesnt have those cool fringes or nice shinny stuff that do nothing, its all about the GO, not the SHOW, but maybe you can still wear a vest to look cool. The us will get sales jobs, sales tax, dealerships, property taxes and business taxes, and payroll taxes.

    • Hornytoad says:

      …and just maybe if you ride it, you will see true unadulterated fun, and you will see that sitting on a vibrating bike with no radiator, might be cool for a girl, but not cool for a dude, but you can still have the cool half helmet, fingerless gloves, and those cool frills like my girlfreind has on her purse!

    • Mr. Mike says:

      This is precisely the attitude that for decades helped prolong the flow of crap automobiles from Detroit and ended up almost killing the domestic auto industry. When the the U.S. auto industry could no longer ignore the loss of sales to foreign manufacturers they wised up and started to make great cars that people wanted.

      Maybe if Harley-Davidson created some truly exciting and well engineered machines like the one above and used their marketing muscle to reach out beyond the chrome and leather fringe set we wouldn’t be having this conversation.

  27. Dave says:

    Hilarious. Completely new motorcycles from a brands that hasvenever competed in two segments (Nuda and Diavel) and guys are hung up license plate holders and front fenders.

    A great quote from a colleague of mine: “The building is burning down and everybody is concerned about the drapes.”

    Don’t like it, don’t buy it. Plenty of people think the bikes you (or me) ride are stupid (I ride a Superhawk). Would you rather share the road with this bike’s prospective customers in 8000lb SUV’s or on this?

    • Mickey says:

      Hung up? No. I suppose you would rather stifle the first amendment and not let people speak freely about how they feel about something but hey, that’s your perrogative I suppose. I say let the people speak.

      And no, I won’t be buying it, as I like to spend my money on bikes that are pleaasing to my eye (there are 5 of them in the garage right now).I am one of those that doesn’t care for the oragami look, and won’t buy a bike with wierd angles all over it, or what to my mind are stupid looking fenders or licence plate holders.

      • Jeff says:

        Can we please give the “first amendment” bit a rest? No one’s suing you or imprisoning you. You can post all you want about the eye candy in your garage, or how you’ll only buy motorcycles because they’re pretty. No one will take legal action to stop you.

    • RD350 says:

      I agree with Dave. People love to focus on the minuscule negatives rather than the overwhelming positives.

      “oh I hate the mirrors …”

      Give it a fooking rest already.

      • Mickey says:

        and some people have to overlook the positive comments and dwell on the negative ones.The first thing I said was the weight and horsepower figures were outstanding, but you completely ignored those positive comments and went right for the one negative comment I said about the front fender.
        Tell me again who is focusing on the miniscule negatives?

  28. endoman says:

    I could just kiss my driver’s license goodbye.

  29. brian says:

    I grew up riding Triumphs and Nortons. For years and years it seemed like all the wiz-bang technology went into sport bikes and those of us who prefered standards were left wanting. Times are changing and finally some manufacturers are ‘getting it’.

  30. Roadrash1 says:

    Looks like it would be a riot! Wow, that windshield will really catch the bugs….2 or 3 maybe.
    I’m glad somebody is making some new models. It has been pretty slow in that area lately…

  31. Gary says:

    I realize that they are going for something completely different styling wise, and a minimalistic design for appearance and weight considerations. However, while I probably could live with that weird front fender, I think a more standard item would be prefered by most. I also think the totaly exposed radiator should have some sort of shrowd on the sides and screen on the front. Otherwise, bravo!

  32. pat says:

    why I would not buy it
    1) The head light
    2) The price
    3) It’s a bmw

  33. fazer6 says:

    The only advantage I see over an F800R is the adjustable fork, and the base model doesn’t even get that.

    • Fred M. says:

      So more horsepower and lower weight are not an “advantage.”

      Maybe the handling of these bikes is far superior. Maybe the comfort is better. Maybe the area under the torque curve is greater. Maybe the fuel injection/spark mapping is better. Maybe the styling of this bike really appeals to some riders to whom the F800′s styling does not.

      Frankly, you’ve never ridden the Huskys, probably have not have ridden the F800R. So you don’t know squat about how they compare.

      • fazer6 says:

        Actually, I have ridden the 800R, extensively. I actually like the motor, and find the handling extremely neutral and predictable, even if not super quick.
        I’ve also owned a husky SM610, I’m I’m pretty confident the Nuda won’t be nearly as entertaining, though the ergonomics look to be just as uncomfortable.
        My worry is that the Nuda will be priced well above the poor-selling beemer, through a much smaller dealer network, and probably cost much more than say an Aprilia Dorsoduro, but withe a much duller motor.
        Tuning tweaks aside, it’s still a parallel twin.

        • Fred M. says:

          How can you be “confident” about how “entertaining” the Nuda will be based on having owned an earlier Husky with half as many cylinders and about 50% less displacement? I’m not trying to be mean, but you can’t judge a bike by spec sheets, press releases, and pictures. I had no idea that an air-cooled Buell could be an absolute blast to ride — till I tried one.

          Nothing wrong with a parallel twin — and this is coming from someone who owns two V-twin Buells (XB12Ss and 1125CR), an opposed twin (Ural Solo sT), a single (Suzuki DR-Z400S.

          You “actually like the motor” on the F800R, but you don’t see any advantage to another 100ccs and a lot more horsepower? It makes more horsepower than the Aprilia Dosoduro 750 and the bike weighs a lot less.

          The Aprilia doesn’t sell because, like all supermoto style bikes, it’s tall, uncomfortable, and impractical. Supermotos are one class of bike that everyone says they will buy in letters to the editor but then don’t when the bikes show up in the dealer showrooms.

        • Jim Huton says:

          Lets see a Doroduro weighs alot more than a Nuda almost as much as a Tuono 1000. Dorsoduro has alot less horsepower, will not be as good in the corners or transitions. The only thing my SM610 was lacking was a bit more power. The Nuda takes care of that yes I know it is more of a street bike than motard but not by much. Think Duke 3 with more power. The Nuda should be very good.

  34. Tommy See says:

    America is not ready for these machines.
    The Europeans are years ahead of us.
    Rip it up !

    • Denny says:

      Not so much they would be ‘ahead’ but what is happening here (at least in Canada) is growing prevalance of cruisers. So, this kind of thing is not what would catch here, I mean in numbers. In Europe however is far more choice and variety, that’s for sure. But they also use it more as transportati0n than we in NA do.

  35. falcodoug says:

    Nice! Could I trade my Tuono and DR650 in for this beast? Two in one? O.K. how much?

  36. Kjazz says:

    I dont like the front fender either, but pretty much everything else is dang cool to me.

    • MGNorge says:

      A look again at the front fender had me thinking what fenders were like when I first started riding in the mid-sixties. Most wrapped half way around the front tire. So many of today’s stylish bikes have only an abbreviation of a fender.

      • Kjazz says:

        Yeah, this thing might eventually grow on me…..time will tell!

        I think it would be cool if Husky would find a way of putting the polished sides of the tank back on their new machines. I remember Husqvarna with polished knees areas on the tanks. Circa 1970s CR400s etc.

  37. Mickey says:

    weight and horsepower figures are outstanding, but my taste hasn’t changed since we saw the prototypes. I’d have to be blindfolded and led to it to throw a leg over it. The front fender is as stupid looking as the Diavels Lic plate holder

    • Bud says:

      Same here. Probably a blast to ride, but ugly as sin.

      • Thommo says:

        “…blast to ride, but ugly as sin”

        Someone had to fill the hole Buell left in the marketplace :p

        • Phil K says:

          This is the kind of bike that everyone gathers around to gawk at on a Saturday morning. Many nice words are spoken about (out of kindness) and then it is completely ignored from that point on.
          Ugly is as ugly does and this bike does it in spades. Who was is charge of headlight design??? They should be flogged and dragged nude behind a Nuda until they’ve paid for their errors.

  38. JRC says:

    Love it, want one, can’t wait.