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Motus Motorcycles Announces Dealers, Pricing and final Horsepower Numbers for 2013 Models

We told you about Alabama-based Motus Motorcycles’ exciting MST sport-tourer last July (I even got to ride on one), but there were still some questions unanswered: how much and when and where can I buy one? Motus has some pre-production bikes on display at Daytona this year, and has announced standard equipment, pricing, options and a list of new dealers for the 2013 models.

The bikes will go into production this fall, and Motus is taking reservations from a limited number of customers. They can choose from two models, the $30,975MST or higher-spec $36,975 MST-R, and both bikes are well-equipped. The MST gets a fully adjustable Öhlins front fork and Progressive Suspension rear shock, Brembo brake calipers, Givi side cases, a Sargent seat, centerstand, 720-watt alternator and the incredible Pratt and Miller 1650cc liquid-cooled pushrod V-Four rated at 165 horsepower and 122 foot-pounds of torque. Other items of interest: built-in Powerlet accesory plugs, ride-by-wire throttle, dual-overdrive transmission (not explained in Motus’ press materials but I assume that means both fifth and sixth gears are overdriven, which makes sense with such a torquey engine) and to address the concerns of driveshaft fans, an XW-ring chain rated to 20,000 miles and a “hybrid” rear sprocket with a lifetime warranty.

The MST-R, priced at (gulp!) $36,975 adds race-quality Öhlins components front and back, forged monobloc Brembo calipers, forged OZ wheels and an upgraded powerplant that makes 185 hp, in case 165 hp is too weak for you. Accessories include a Givi topcase, different windscreens, and heated grips and seat. Colors for both bikes are limited to white or black.

Motus also released an initial list of dealers (see list below), mostly in Southern states. There was no information about a California model, but I imagine the MST’s specs will have the California Air Resources Board on their highest state of bureaucratic nit-pickiness. Still, with fuel-injection and sophisticated engine-management systems, expect it to be street legal in all 50 states eventually—we’ll keep you posted.

So here’s the question for you: is $31,000-plus too much to pay for what sounds like the sport-tourer American riders have been requesting for many years? That’s a $10,000 premium over BMW’s six-cylinder K1600GT (which makes similar power but is 170 pounds heavier), but I would posit that you’re getting three bikes for the price of 1.5 K1600GTs—a track-capable sportbike (Motus President Lee Conn claims he can lap his home track at Barber Motorsports Complex on an MST at about the same times as his Honda CBR600), a fuel-sipping (50 mpg was the goal—we don’t know if that’s been achieved), nimble commuter and a continent-crossing mega-sports-tourer. It’s also handmade in the USA and sounds kick-ass. We’re looking forward to riding one and expect that to happen this summer, so stay tuned.

LIST OF DEALERS

AF1 Racing, 304 East Cesar Chavez, Austin, TX, 78701, 512-482-8377 www.af1racing.com, ed@af1racing.com

Battley Cycles, 7830 Airpark Road, Gaithersburg, MD, 20879, 301-948-4581 www.battley.com, info@battley.com

Cruisin’ 66, 1310 S Glenstone Avenue, Springfield, MO, 65804, 417-891-9998 www.cruisin66cycles.com, sales@cruisin66cycles.com

Moto Corse Performance, 11227 NE 9th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33304, 954-522-8047 www.motocorseperformance.com, Contact@EuropeanMotorsportsInc.com

Motus Louisville, 1700 Arthur Street, Louisville, KY 40208, 502-634-1340 www.harleydavidsonlouisville.com, questions@MotusLouisville.com

Redline Performance Motorsports, 7331 George Washington Memorial Parkway, Yorktown, VA, 23692, 757-989-5000 www.redlinemotors.com, david@redlinemotors.com

Riders Hill, 3003 Morrison Moore Parkway E, Dahlonega, GA, 30533, 706-864-7777

EuropeanMotorsportsInc.com, contact@europeanmotorsportsinc.com

RPM Cycles, 13700 N. Stemmons Freeway, Farmers Branch, TX, 75234, 972-620-3883 www.rpmcycletx.com, cliff@rpmcycletx.com

161 Comments

  1. f.fernandez says:

    well, doc, yes you got it right . i am lucky to be in the demographics for this bike and have been following it ,as i did the Indian when it first launched and then again on the second launch ,but never did get around to justify paying more than a harley. i ended up with the harley at very close to the indian price .but the hd was well sorted out .and it complimented my other bikes ,sports and sport tourers.
    anyhow as i see this motus …….they will sell some but it will not be,unfortunately ,a repeat buss.,nor will it attract those that would spend $30 k for a harley cvo. different crowd.but one with the monies .
    and unfortunately 99 % of the sports bike crowd do not have the means .
    then there are the ducati riders who do have the means and will move in this direction. but even with the duc crowd how many do buy their top of the line models . the current economy will work against this bike . i will test ride it and we will see ????

  2. britishbikes says:

    Well here we go. This cobbed together looking thing with those off the shelf looking exposed plastic secondary coils, the not direct injection, the engine that is sideways yet pulls a greasy chain. The puny fairing. The off the shelf saddle bags sticking way out there. No ABS. No traction control. Innovative new pushrods. I expected it to have rough edges that the big companies don’t have, but I was willing to overlook them and the meager touring accommodations. For 15 grand it would still be a hard sell: It really doesn’t hold a candle to a Connie 14 with its shaft, real saddle bags, ABS, TC,bigger fairing, reliability and dealer network. Probably have all sorts of little issues that would drive you nuts on a long trip. And that awkward looking motor just doesn’t have the finish or lines to be hung out there like that. Looks like something they took out of a tractor junkyard and stuck in a sportbike frame, like some Aussie would build in his garage. By himself. It looks too big to be there, not integrated. Think 1969 cb750. Then look at the Motus. Makes my eyes hurt to look at it. But I was willing to overlook all these things to buy an American bike. Maybe even pay a premium price of 18k for it. 30k and I’m thinking 402 hp Mustang GT! Even if I had 50K budget for a bike there is no way I’d spend 30k of it on an awkward parts bin bike like that. I’d feel like a loser.

  3. Reinhart says:

    I’d pay $15,000 to $20,000 for the MOTUS if I was in the market for a sport touring bike, no more. I would compare it to what’s offered by other manufacturers and make my decision based on capabilities related to sport touring and not just what kind of engine is hanging from the frame. Price would also be a consideration since I don’t believe in rewarding a manufacturer with 2 to 3x the price of other sport touring bikes because it’s “new” to the market. That is how 99.98% of the people in the market for this type of motorcycle will make their decision. It’s the logical approach for the person that has to work for his hard earned dollars. Also, why pay MOTUS money for a bike that is not proven and may well be a doddering piece of c@@@ and leave you on the side of the road in the middle of nowhere while the manufacturer figures out a cure?

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “I’d pay $15,000 to $20,000 for the MOTUS if I was in the market for a sport touring bike, no more. I would compare it to what’s offered by other manufacturers and make my decision based on capabilities related to sport touring and not just what kind of engine is hanging from the frame.”

      of course. this is SOP for your run o’ the mill “consumer”.

      re: “That is how 99.98% of the people in the market for this type of motorcycle will make their decision. It’s the logical approach for the person that has to work for his hard earned dollars.”

      unfortunately you’re confused as to WHO the market is. ego makes us want to think it’s US, and it’s a right “slap in the face” when we learn that it’s not. that’s what you’re experiencing. the target here doesn’t work (at least not in the traditional sense) nor do they they suffer the daily burden of “logic”. what’s logic got to do with driving a veyron up mulholland…? :)

      • britishbikes says:

        This thing is a failure. A sport touring bike is a price point item, not so much a status machine. We ride because we like to ride, not because the bike we ride costs 18k more than a better bike. It isn’t like sportbikes where you want to walk though fire to get the best, or Harley where the bike is more than a bike. A sport touring bike is like a pickup truck in a way, we want a good one, but also good value, something we feel comfortable on 1200 miles from home while the rain pours down. I’m not sure how to explain this, but I feel it in my gut.

  4. Bob-O says:

    Here’s what they need:

    $19,900 for a 145hp entry naked version. Motus V41

    $24,900 for a 160hp mid-grade version. Motus V42

    -Upgrade exhaust, brakes, wheels/tires, entry level Ohlins. Small cafe fairing.

    $29,900 for a 185hp premium grade version. Motus V43

    – Carbon Exhaust, premium spec wheels / brakes / High end Ohlins. single sided swing arm, half fairing.

    $44,900 for a 201hp exclusive grade version. Motus V4-R

    – Exclusive titanium/carbon exhaust, highest grade brembo brakes, highest grade race wheels, highest grade Ohlins front and rear, single sinded swing-arm Unique bodywork. Production # capped at (?)

    Remember, the 1% that can afford such items add up to 3.15 million in this country alone. As soon as they come up with a “Monster” version, I am a buyer. If they come up with a limited run, ultimate package that is like i described… I buy two.

    .

  5. Veebs says:

    Evidently I’m way out of the target market.

    Let us know when they churn out a $7,000 lightweight for city and light highway use.

  6. Auphliam says:

    According to the Motus press release, the color options for the MST are Speed Silver Metalic and Flame Red Metallic. Only the MST-R is restricted to Carbon Black or Strong White.

    http://motusmotorcycles.com/PDF/MotusDaytona2012PR_2.pdf

    I’m personally a little disappointed with the price. I knew they’d be pricey, just was hoping they weren’t that pricey. I’ve been following Motus since the first news broke about the project. I had been holding on to the hope that there’d be an outside chance of me owning an R…those thoughts were erased with the $40K price tag.

    Oh well, it was still a great story to follow. I wish them well.

    • Dale says:

      I’ll bet I could talk them into throwing the Red stuff into the $37,000 deal.

      A Red MST-R would be Sweet.

      There’s only one thing stopping me from ordering one right now :-(

  7. Artoo says:

    Kudos for trying, but let’s face reality:

    This category is jam-packed with incredibly good bikes. It’s a growing segment and some are making the sport-tourer their “flagship” bike, pouring all their know-how into it. Some of your choices are:

    -The incredible BMW K1600GT.
    -The super-fast yet comfortable Kawi Concours 14.
    -The legendary FJR.
    -If the powerful engine is your thing, for sport-touring you can also use a big-muscle bike like Yamaha’s V-Max, Suzuki’s B-King, or Triumph’s Rocket III
    -There’s also the excellent Pan-European.
    -BMW’s no-less legendary RT.
    -Guzzi’s personality-loaded Norge.
    -The beautiful and agile Triumph Spring ST.
    And the list goes on… It’s hard to push a new product into the market, but nearly impossible when that market is already saturated with a great variety of excellent offers at a much better price. Sorry I don’t think this bike has a commercial future.

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “And the list goes on… It’s hard to push a new product into the market, but nearly impossible when that market is already saturated with a great variety of excellent offers at a much better price.”

      porsche thought this about it’s 911, ferrari thought this about it’s enzo, aston thought this about it’s vantage, and lamborghini thought this about it’s murcielago. then along came bugatti (a marque with little in the way of modern history) with a price point of $1.7 million (more than double that of an enzo) and they sell out the first run of 300 cars. this begs the question, how can this be in a market saturated with a great variety of excellent offers at a much better price…?

  8. DLM says:

    I saw these bikes when they were on “tour” last fall and made a stop in eastern VA. Considering that they were prototypes they were nice looking bikes. The riding position (OK sitting position as demo rides were not available) was acceptable if a little snug (at 5’8 160 LBS I’m not a big guy) and the engines certainly sounded nice. No doubt they have “WOW” factor covered. But when I ask about the availablity of ABS braking they seemed to be caught a little off guard. The guys mentioned the cost of developing an ABS system but one would think that ABS manufacturers could and would certainly help a small company with that task unless the volume is so low that the numbers just aren’t there to make it worth their time. Anyway, a premium motorcycle (and they are certainly priced that way) in this day and age w/o at least the option of ABS braking isn’t quite premium in my mind. Although I certainly wish them success I won’t be first in line for one.

    • Jake says:

      bikerrandy says:
      “I don’t need or want no stinkin’ ABS !! I already know how to ride competently, thank you.”
      While I appreciate the sentiments of ‘bikerrandy’ in wanting to just ride the bike, in today’s American Sport-Touring market not having ABS in a non-starter. It’s almost ‘mandatory’ — may even be “Law”, soon?
      Yamaha couldn’t sell the non-ABS FJR in America — had to make it mandatory.
      How the MOTUS guys missed this is hard to understand…

  9. Fozzy says:

    Nice to see a US motorcycle company bringing a fresh meaning to the term “1%er”, waka waka waka.

  10. zuki says:

    I’d buy one if I could! – maybe next year I can swing it. Looks great and the engine is boss. Not surprised they are a bit pricey at this point – it’s not even worth trying to explain to the majority complaining about the price.

  11. Theo says:

    I really like this bike too, and I’m in the demographic to buy one. But I can’t swing numbers like that.

  12. Theo says:

    I’m in the demographic to buy one, but that’s too much for me.

  13. Reinhart says:

    Even if I had the money to buy one of these I wouldn’t. It’s actually a rather ugly bike (what a hideous fairing!) made interesting by virtue of it’s installed powerplant. There are PLENTY of bikes out there that are better motorcycles and better looking to boot! Is Needless-Markup planning to list this bike for the man that has everything in their annual Christmas catalogue?

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “Is Needless-Markup planning to list this bike for the man that has everything in their annual Christmas catalogue?”

      no, just the Robb Report Motorcycling edition, but that’s not a bad idea.

  14. JasonB says:

    Here’s a couple of facts the Motus fans are neglecting to realize. Yes, there are plenty of $30K+ rolling wastes of money out there. When you start talking that price for something on two wheels you’re typically talking an image purchase. Whether it’s an MV that will never see a race track or a generic, chromed out v-twin that handles like the trucks mentioned above the purchaser is looking for a status symbol. These are far from practical bikes yet there seems to be no end to the line of image seekers looking to buy in.

    The problem, this bike isn’t supposed to be impractical. By the companies own description it’s a sport tourer, one of the most highly contested segments in motorcycling today. A category that is defined by user friendly ergonomics, carrying capacity and real world features. To cap that all off it’s one of the toughest segments with respect to shoppers, guys who will literally fly into a city 8 states away to save $500 and then ride the bike home. This is not an image category, it’s a riders category.

    So when you’re typical mid-life crisis guy is standing there wondering what he should buy to prove he’s still got some swagger what do you think he’s going to pick? The Panigale S Tricolore that oozes sex or the bland looking thing with push rods that doesn’t even come standard with an electric adjustable windscreen? In a category defined by sense this bike has none and that’s where Motus screwed the proverbial pooch.

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “To cap that all off it’s one of the toughest segments with respect to shoppers, guys who will literally fly into a city 8 states away to save $500 and then ride the bike home. This is not an image category, it’s a riders category.”

      sorry but what you’ve mistaken in modern day for a “rider”…? is nothing more than a “billionaire cheapskate”. that’s what we called them 10, 20, 30 years ago.

      • JasonB says:

        I don’t care what cute little nickname you’ve come up with, that doesn’t change the FACT that this is the typical demographic that’s looking to purchase a sport tourer. And if you read my words you’ll see I use the word rider to refer to the category, not the purchaser. Sport touring bikes aren’t typically purchased with the intention of showing off at Starbucks at your local bike night or cruising up Mulholland, they’re purchased to ride.

        I can only guess that you either work for Motus or have already put a deposit on one, that’s the only thing I can come up with that justifies some of your laughable replies. To try and compare what Motus has built to a Veyron is delusional. This is not a lightweight hypersport with gobs of horsepower and trickle down MotoGP electronics. It’s a fairly bland, slightly heavy motorcycle who’s most exciting feature is that it has a push rod v-four derived from an American classic car. Comparing the Motus to a $670,000.00 Ferrari is akin to comparing a Kawasaki Versys to an RC213V, idiotic. The buyer you’re describing in your posts for this bike do not exist, at least not in enough quantity to sustain the business model.

        • Norm G. says:

          re: “I can only guess that you either work for Motus or have already put a deposit on one”

          the correct answer is C.) none of the above.

          re: “that’s the only thing I can come up with that justifies some of your laughable replies.”

          see, the devaluing consumer mentality you’ve adopted the past 10 years now BLOCKS you from coming up with what is the simplest of answers. LOL ie. i’m just a person who likes motorcycles…! :) (PS: see entry for Occam’s Razor)

        • Norm G. says:

          re: “To try and compare what Motus has built to a Veyron is delusional.”
          re: “Comparing the Motus to a $670,000.00 Ferrari is akin to comparing a Kawasaki Versys to an RC213V, idiotic.”

          wait, it just occured to me something MORE delusional and idiotic is occuring…?? :) you don’t know the definition of the word “analogy”…!? LOL how old are you…? tell the truth. i ask because a mature ADULT would know the subtle (but critical) difference between an analogy and a comparison. teenagers and many young adults would not.

  15. JCM says:

    I think that this move is the right one for a start-up company. Supply and demand is a fundamental consideration. They must recoup R&D expenditures soon, but they more than likely do not have the production capabilities yet to push out 20,000+ machines/year. With this in mind, they must strike a balance between units sold and return on investment. Also, this group is about high spec and high performance, a pricey endeavour for any company. (See Triumph Street Triple R)

  16. 40yrRider says:

    Wow, this is sad. I had high hopes for these guys but they have priced themselves out of business in my opinion. Only the well-heeled (Leno?) will be adding these to their collections. I was hoping they would be a bit more mainstream. Nice machine but 30K and over? I could get a very nice car for that. Oh well. Sad.

  17. Hot Dog says:

    Who stole the Guzzi Redhead? Shouldn’t it be orange? All BS aside, it’s a beautiful machine and I bet they sell a boat load of em’. Will they come with those exhaust cans or will the Feds make them wear big ugle silencers?

  18. Jamo says:

    $30,000! Good luck with that. At that price, I suppose, they only need to sell one. But it begs the question: What does Motorcycle of the United States have that Triumph Sprint GT does not have, for less than half the dosh?

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “What does Motorcycle of the United States have that Triumph Sprint GT does not have”

      ummnn, a “Pratt & Miller 1650cc liquid-cooled pushrod V-Four”…? just spit-ballin’.

  19. vfr rider says:

    I Love it, but don’t have the money for it, wish I did… I’m sure they’ll have no problem finding buyers.
    I kinda wish the side bags were a bit more styllish. Givi makes good products, but those bags are the cheapest things on that bike, for $30k they should have gone with something a bit more custom and stylish. The VFR, FJR, and Concours 14 all come with their own custom stylish luggage to match the curves and style of the bike. Thats my only complaint. Other than that I wish the Motus team good luck and hope to see more from their company in future, maybe a lower spec model for around $15k :)

    • Bob says:

      Probably could have gotten Corbin to make some luggage that blended better. But man, Corbin would have made this bike sell for another $1000 over the cost of Givis.

  20. takehikes says:

    PT Barnum is alive and well it seems…..30k? Really? For half a small block Chevy? Hilarious…..and I have a whole garage full of motorcycles I could buy with 30k that would make me happier than this pig.

  21. Hair says:

    I would rather do a low side on a 8k 600CBR than a 30K (your sliding on your head) Sport ride. And when the day comes to finally sell that boat. What kind of coin used market be willing to pay?

    Sorry I’m just not willing to even think of going there.

  22. carl says:

    Like it a lot, a light weight sports tourer , almost seems something the other manufactures have forgotten how to make. With high seats on most bikes now adays keeping the weight down for us short legged people makes a huge difference at the lights. The price is high but if they are dependable they will sell them all.

  23. craigj says:

    I wish them well, but …

    Like it or not, motorcycles are a toy for the vast majority of those who ride them. You cannot compare a $36k bike to a +$36k family vehicle. They serve opposite purposes and opposite neededs. I admire Motus for that they’ve come up with. It interests me as a sport-tourer, but it’s not for me. I looks much too small for my XXL frame, and then there’s that price thing. At $21k, it wouldn’t be a discussion, but $31k, it is. This isn’t some blingy chopper or Confederate art-bike. It’s supposed to be a something you ride for weeks at a time, and that price ends the interest quite abruptly. I’m quite certain that the only place I will ever see one is the next time I visit the museum at Barber.

  24. Wanderer says:

    “Colors for both bikes are limited to white or black.” – except for the silver one in the picture???

    Cool, but too rich for my blood – I’ll stick with my FJR and tame 145 hp. Would like to pick up a used one some time!

  25. Jeff F says:

    Congrat’s for a new USA Startup. IMHO, if you’d re-think your price point, you’d have a fighting chance.@ $26k Maybe. @$36k I don’t think so, that is beyond a few Jay Leno’s, owners of Aircraft and really Big Boats. Why not aim for selling 10,000 instead of 1000? You’ve already got your heart and sole into it. Price it right and let the rest of us enjoy your efforts, and you’ll have a better chance to both survive AND make a profit.

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “if you’d re-think your price point, you’d have a fighting chance.@ $26k Maybe.”

      no, we would only just complain about the price @ 26. unfortunately we motorcyclists have adopted a “freelunch” mentality. we’d much rather “hitchhike” on the backs of the industry. blowback and unintended consequences be damned.

      re: “that is beyond a few Jay Leno’s, owners of Aircraft and really Big Boats.”

      except here in the wealthiest country on the planet, those types aren’t “few”, they are MANY.

      re: “Why not aim for selling 10,000 instead of 1000? You’ve already got your heart and sole into it.”

      in other words, you recognize their substantal commitment of time and resources, but rather than “valuing” this, you’d much rather try to use this investment as a leverage against them.

      re: “Price it right and let the rest of us enjoy your efforts, and you’ll have a better chance to both survive AND make a profit.”

      that’s not true (at worst it’s a lie). the devalued japanese manufacturers ESPECIALLY know this. in the 21st century, your best chances lie up market in catering to those who have the money in the first place (what a crazy concept), than targeting bottom feeders. bottom feeders will always “bottom feed”… even when the long run shows it’s to their own detriment.

  26. Rich says:

    Love the simplicity of the bike and the look. Look forward to reviews of the production model.

  27. Mick says:

    I like everything about the idea of this bike.

    I admit to having a very low opinion of the street bike market. This bike sort of illustrates why. Sure a large manufacturer can serve up a bike a lot cheaper. Economies of scale is a big deal. They can even serve up a whole boat load of seemingly necessary complexity and technology to make their “light weight” wonders work the way they do.

    Oh yeah? What if you took a sort of bent up front end from an old sixties rail dragster and modded it to hold a fork and a sort of shrunken V8 car engine that you cut in half. None of the specs on this thing are out that far out of bounds a push rod for a car that has huge maintenance intervals and outstanding service life by motorcycle standards. Once more. Gm/Ford/Chrysler could turn out a very similar product for about five thousand bucks a pop. Cheaper than a current dirt bike. Ford could make a Bronco that you could actually ride.

    I honestly feel bad that I won’t buy one of these bikes. I absolutely support their work. But I ride singles.

    One of the things they could offer, for a few dollars more, is some is some addition, subtraction and/or resourcing of finishes and parts, by some in house enthusiast wizard that likes overtime, before assembly. Hopefully the tank blends into the frame without the help of the fairing. That would be big deal for the street fighter types. If this thing catches fire with the NASCAR crowd. They won’t know what hit ‘em.

    Good luck! Kudos!

  28. Marshall says:

    $30K+ with pushrods? Pushrods are for the Smithsonian not for ICE…

    • blackcayman says:

      ever heard of the Corvette ZO6???

      • JB says:

        Why would you say Z06, and not ZR1? LOL!

        • zuki says:

          Both the Corvette Z06 and ZR1 engines (LS7 and LS9, respectively) are masterpieces of engineering – and most definitely state-the-art technology. Race-winning designs! Cam-in-block (CIB) is a smart way to go for Motus.

          @ Marshall – Overhead-cam (finger tappet or bucket tappet if you’re so inclined) technology is basically just as old as any other ‘ICE’ technology, and doesn’t necessarily make an engine wonderful or worth more.

          Bob said it very well… it’s smart engineering and design and it’s been well-executed here in the engine department. Very lightweight, compact, more simple (and reliable), powerful. Don’t forget about the direct-injection – a first in the motorcycle industry I believe.

    • Bob says:

      Pushrod designs still have their place in engine design. Overhead cams have their place too, but their place isn’t everywhere. An ICE uses certain design technologies based on their intended use and expectations. Pushrods are a good choice for this design as it allows a more more compact engine assembly. OHC would make it too tall to be fit for purpose and add weight.

    • Bud says:

      Which is why the GM’s Northstar DOHC motor is long gone and its pushrod V8 is thriving, right?

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “$30K+ with pushrods? Pushrods are for the Smithsonian not for ICE”

      ever heard of a 5.9 cummins with more than a 1000hp and 1000lb/ft of torque???

  29. Jake says:

    ABS…? Did I miss it…?
    If it doesn’t have ABS who in America (other than Ninja 10 & 14 riders) will buy it?

    • bikerrandy says:

      I don’t need or want no stinkin’ ABS !! I already know how to ride competently, thank you.

      • Bob says:

        Don’t dismiss the ABS so quickly. The Bosch 9 system had relegated you and your braking skills to the “also ran” category. I’ve had 2 bikes with ABS and enjoyed their benefits when touring through downpours and on snow and ice roads on my trips. It works better than I can in those conditions. The Bosch 9 is simply amazing. Sorry, but as much as you want to believe it, you can not compete. 2 years ago, yes…today…no.

        • Chris says:

          I went to the motorcycle riding school of hard knocks at an age of 5. It’s called motocross,desert racing,isde’s. There is a huge difference in rider skill today. I agree that abs would help most riders out. But give us few the option not to have it. I think it’s great, but just like mandatory health care insurance. It should not be mandatory. PS I pay for my own health insurance, my choice.

  30. PN says:

    I wish Motus well but, no, I’m not interested at those nosebleed prices. Honda and Kawasaki and Yamaha are offering essentially the same bike for half the price, and even BMW with its Six looks like a bargain. And that’s saying something.

  31. mickey says:

    I love those that want to admonish or dismiss those with negative comments. This is a public forum and without the naysayers would be a very boring place to come and read. Who would want to come and read the four posts thinking this or any other bike is the best bike of all times. I njoy reading all the posts, the 4 positive as well as the 86 negative. I find it interesting when others don’t see things the exact same way that I do. So what if one doesn’t like the mufflers, another the decals, another the color of the cylinder head covers. Who cares if someone thinks it doesn’t have enough horsepower, or it could use better suspension components. Being a public forum they have the right to express those feelings. I read them, consider if I agree or not and go on to the next one and read their opinion. Often I will express my own opinion. I suggest you do the same, and I will read your opinion, even if it doesn’t agree with mine…and I promise not to call you names, or dismiss you opinion, just because it’s different than mine,

    • falcodoug says:

      I’m with you.

    • MGNorge says:

      For me it’s not that someone disagrees with my point or view but rather this forum, as well as many others I read, seems to bring out those that wholly dismiss a new model as bunk simply because it doesn’t have some key ingredient that they profess makes it “real” for them. This even before a new model hits the streets! Things like USD forks, radial monobloc calipers for example are a must have to some but I’ve ridden some very nice bikes without those things. It’s not just exchanging useful criticisms, it’s the bitching about the most trivial aspects sometimes. Maybe it’s the slack economy that brings this out but I always wait until I get a ride, then I feel I can comment and it holds more water.

      • mickey says:

        I understand what you are saying, heck none of my bikes have USD forks, yet the old forks I have seem to work for me. Radial monobloc calipers is greek to me. Heck one of my bikes has a single disc front and a drum rear, runs great stops just fine…and none of my bikes have ABS or Traction control. Heck I just sold one that still had POINTS. But we need negative critisism. It makes products better. Without critisism we’d still be driving 60’s Detroit technology cars. Would Harleys have aluminum heads? disc brakes? electric starters? Would Triumphs still be leaving puddles of oil in the garage and riders standing on the side of the road…in the dark? If people didn’t complain, these things wouldn’t get fixed. Manufacturers don’t like to spend money upgrading when people are willing to keep buying the old stuff.

        Personally I like it when someone bitches about something trivial. Like the decals or name plates someone mentioned. I missed that entirely when I looked at the pics and had to go back and see what they were talking about. I looked and thought..”Hmmm, that’s their complaint?..Interesting. Don’t know that that bothers me”. The fellow that complained about the red heads? I agree with him. I think they’d look much better in black or silver. Doesn’t mean you have to. The fellow that complained about standard Givi cases on a $36,000 motorcycle has a point IMO. I can put those same cases on my FZ-1 for less than $600. Shouldn’t an exotic hand built have something, well, exotic and hand built?

        Look if you put something out and let the general public comment, you have to expect those kinds of comments. Most of us can’t afford this motorcycle, or can’t justify spending that much on a motorcycle, so unless MCD is just putting it out there to rub our noses in the fact that here’s something the rich can buy but most of you readers can’t, they have to expect that there will be both positive and negative responses. Gabe seemed really ticked off in his post and I really don’t understand it. Post the report and let the responses fall where they may. Why take offense? Gabe didn’t make the bike, he only reported on it. It’s nothing personal against Gabe. I noticed he said he was going to ride one, something a priveledged moto-journalist will probably get to do. Also noticed he never said he was going to buy one.

        oh I said complaining helped fix things…it hasn’t made this reCaptcha system any better lol

        • MGNorge says:

          Perhaps what I’m saying is the manner in which many respondents air their complaints? It’s the whining and bitching about parts and pieces missing or whatever seems to be much more vicious than those coming from people who are more reserved until they get first-hand experience. On some forums it becomes brand identity and which they are a “fanboy” or not. It’s a whole new breed and they don’t mind cutting things to shreds. I don’t particularly call that constructive criticism which I do feel is healthy.

  32. Mark P. says:

    So we’ve heard many say the price is too high, and we’ve heard many defend their pricing or say they’d buy it they had the money, but I don’t think we’ve heard anyone say they *will* buy one. Is anyone here actually going to put the cash to buy one of these things??

  33. Mark P. says:

    So we’ve heard many say the price is too high, and we’ve heard many defend their pricing or say they’d buy it they had the money, but I don’t think we’ve heard anyone say they *will* buy one. Is anyone here actually going to put the cash to buy one of these things???

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “Is anyone here actually going to put the cash to buy one of these things???”

      i think someone mentioned earlier, those individuals aren’t into the fantasy of the internet. those individuals are out living REALITY. kinda like the guy i see on any given day driving either 1 or his 2 R8’s, murcielago, gallardo, maybach, bentley coupe, or nissan GTR. if i had those cars, i wouldn’t be on the internet either…!? LOL :)

  34. Gabe says:

    Holy crap! Is MD read exclusively by CPAs and hourly financial advisers? I can’t believe how much you guys focus on price and not on the engineering and innovation that’s coming from a two-man start-up.

    If you read my first story on this, you’d see that Motus’ plan is not to sell a million motorcycles. They only need to sell a few hundred a year to break even. Out of 310 million people, that means .00016 percent of the US population needs to buy one.

    Now think about how many guys just in your neighborhood own a family minivan, a car for the wife, multiple cars for teenage/college-age kids, AND a Corvette, Porsche or some other mid-life-crisis $40,000-100,000 car that’s no more practical (and much less fun) than a bike like the Motus.

    It’s one thing to say it’s a cool bike and you can’t afford it (I agree!) but it’s another to declare Motus DOA because not even .00016 percent of the US public can afford the supposedly astronomical $31k MSRP.

    “Maybe Leno can afford to buy one but the average working guy sure can’t.” WTF? As if manufacturers should only build products for working guys. So long Armani, Ritz-Carlton, Ferrari, Neiman-Marcus and single-malt scotch: Fuzzyson says you can’t exist.

    “$36,000? It might as well cost a million-almost nobody can afford the thing.”

    Right…that’s why millions of cars at that price or much more are sold every year in the USA. And it’s okay if “almost nobody” can afford it–Motus will do very well selling 1000 units in the US a year (which is probably 4 times what Moto Guzzi sells, by the way), so almost nobody needs to buy them.

    “OK, how many lawyers, dentists and middle aged corporate officers will buy one of these? That’s the question Motus should have asked upon inception of their business plan.”

    Um, did it occur to you that maybe Motus DID ask those questions? One thing these posters don’t keep in mind is that the income and wealth gap has greatly increased in this country since the 1970s. There are a lot more millionaires and billionaires out there than you think. If you ask me, there are two promising market niches in the motorcycle industry, and expect to see growth: very inexpensive bikes (Chinese/Indian/Taiwanese built small-displacement scooters and motorcycles priced under $4000) and fancy high-end stuff like the Motus.

    Hate all you want–I’m looking forward to riding one.

    • Tom R says:

      I actually do think that electric dog polishers would have been a wiser investment, but it is a free country and Motus can do what they wish. I hope they can sell enough to make a go of it.

    • Bob says:

      You’re very right Gabe. There are plenty of vehicles out there that are very expensive and less practical. People buy them anyway. As a Texas resident, I see $40-50k pickup trucks everywhere and only 5% of them have ever had more than a few bags of mulch in the bed come spring time. The rest of the time it’s a waste except to feed the owner’s ego. Same with the Vettes. Can’t carry a family of four anywhere. How many 4 wheeled $100k pieces of jewelry are running around the country when a $20k will do the job just as well? And as you say, there are plenty of other markets this applies to.

      What about kitchens? How many average housewives cook well enough to justify a $5k Viking cooktop, $10k sub zero fridge and $10k worth of double ovens when most cook simply average food, nuke bag popcorn, bake a digiorno pizza and stuff a gallon of milk and 6 pack of beer on a shelf? Do they really need the $15k granite counter tops, $2k cookware and $1k knife set?

      I put down my $1000 deposit last fall when they came ’round looking for dealers. Sat on it, thoroughly examined it and loved it. It fit me well in physical stature and suited my needs. I was very excited. But I was only prepared to spend $20k + options. So, I will be getting a refund, sadly.

      Best of luck to them.

    • JasonB says:

      You said “Hate all you want–I’m looking forward to riding one.” But will you buy one?

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “Holy crap! Is MD read exclusively by CPAs and hourly financial advisers?”

      actually gabe, the problem arises directly because they AREN’T cpa’s and hourly financial advisers. cpa’s and hfa’s understand how money works.

  35. Hoss says:

    I like it. Out of my price range, but maybe in a couple years. My biggest complaint is that there is no dealer here in the home state of Alabama

  36. Superchicken says:

    I’d have to see a real review, not a review of someone just riding on the back, before I’d be willing to render judgement. It’s obviously going to be produced in limited numbers, which is going to impact their ability to hit lower price points so the price is understandable. I wish them well and I’m looking forward to some real reviews on this thing.

  37. Speed99 says:

    Coming from a guy that has an MV Agusta and Aprilia Mille R, i would not spend $31k on this bike. WAY too pricey for what you get.

    If anyone disagrees, then I propose a challenge where each person puts $1000 of their own cash towards a bet as to whether or not this line of bikes will be successful at the current price point.

    They may sell some units, but they will need to drop the price in order to get a little market share and buzz in the motorcycle community. At $31k, that wont happen anytime soon.

    • Auphliam says:

      I fear, with a $30k-$40k price window, they are going to get all the wrong kind of buzz in the motorcycle community.

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “They may sell some units, but they will need to drop the price in order to get a little market share and buzz in the motorcycle community.”

      or DON’T drop the price, have leno buy one, then do a viral video from his garage and create 2x market share and buzz in the affluent community.

  38. Doc says:

    I like this bike. I would own one but for the price. But I will keep my eye on it anyway. I wish Motus the best of luck. As for the whiners on here, get over it. If this thing cost $3999.00, weighed 250 lbs, made 300hp, ran the quarter in under 8 seconds and could be put on layaway at your local Walmart, people would still bitch about something. To some it’s all about numbers and to some extent , it is. But I really feel sorry for you if that is all that matters. You have the fastest bike? So what! You have the cheapest bike? Good for you! While you’re enjoying your cheapness or your high tech, I’ll be enjoying the ride. This old saying fits; If I have to explain it to you, then you wouldn’t understand.