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2013 Triumph Daytona 675 and 675R Unveiled

Triumph has completely redesigned its middleweight supersport, the Daytona 675 and 675R.  Both bikes get a bump in horsepower (to 126) and torque (to 55 ft.lbs), while losing weight.

A new chassis is claimed to improve weight distribution and handling.  As usual, the 675R version receives uprated suspension and other components.

U.S. pricing will be $11,599 for the standard model, and $13,499 for the Daytona 675R.  Here is the full press release from Triumph:

  • Brand new, higher-powered 675cc triple with 126bhp (+2bhp), 55ft.lbs. (+2ft.lbs.) of torque and an increased 14,400rpm red line
  • New chassis with improved weight distribution and repositioned exhaust
  • New switchable ABS system with track mode
  • Slip-assist clutch standard
  • 3lbs. lighter
  • R version with race-inspired components and quickshifter standard
  • Two-year, unlimited-mileage warranty standard

Daytona 675
Triumph’s Daytona 675 shook up supersport convention with its three-cylinder, 675cc format when it first appeared in 2006, then it did the same to the established order by setting new class performance standards.

Ever since its debut the Daytona has consistently topped comparison tests, won awards around the world and even trounced high-specification superbikes in the prestigious international Masterbikes shootout, winning this toughest and most comprehensive test of all sports bikes two years in a row. Race versions have taken titles around the world and six years later it’s still a winner on the track. Yet it’s the Daytona’s razor-sharp style and growling, muscle-packed character which has appealed just as much to its dedicated owners.

Now for 2013 Triumph has unleashed an all-new Daytona 675 and Daytona 675R, with a brand-new engine, new frame, fresh and sophisticated new bodywork and a host of other changes built on everything Triumph has learned from the enormously successful outgoing model. A few tweaks and modifications would have kept the 675 on the pace, but the 2013 Daytona is set to raise the bar once again.

The result is a bike which is 3lbs. lighter than the old model, with more power, an extended rev range, greater precision, feel and agility. It’s faster on the track, better on the road and even more satisfying to own.

The heart of the new Daytona is its new engine, which brings more performance and a subtly new character, too. The key change is the wider bore and shorter stroke dimensions, allowing a higher 14,400rpm rev limit to gain more power and a broader spread of usable revs. Facilitating this is the new block, separate from the upper crankcase and with ceramic coated aluminum bores so it can be made stronger to cope with the higher pressures. Power is up 2bhp to 126bhp, peaking earlier at 12,600rpm and revving on for longer. The torque maximum is 2ft.lbs higher at 55.3lb.ft, with an increase across the rev range.

On the intake side are new twin injectors per cylinder, aiding the power and torque gains as well as improving fueling accuracy and efficiency. For the first time, titanium valves are fitted, helping the engine achieve higher revs and allowing Triumph’s engineers room to reshape them to improve gas flow. This has been so effective there has been no need to increase the valve diameter, despite the wider bore. It’s further helped by the new larger section intake, which flows air straight into the center of the bike, right through the headstock, and as a major bonus this increases the quality and volume of the signature three-cylinder snarling intake roar for the rider.

The exhaust system is a clear change as the compact and purposeful new unit now sits beneath the engine rather than beneath the rear seat. This is a consequence of the mission by Triumph’s engineers to centralize the bike’s mass as much as possible and move the weight forward, key factors in making the new Daytona even more agile and yet more stable at speed.

The transmission features a new slip-assist clutch to provide a lighter lever action and help prevent rear wheel hop under heavy braking. This is aided by the engine management which opens the throttle butterflies to reduce engine braking.

As well as incorporating the new, innovative intake duct, the frame uses fewer sections in its construction for a cleaner, stronger design and has sharper geometry and a shorter wheelbase to make full use of the revised mass distribution. The rear subframe, constructed from high pressure die cast aluminium, not only looks fantastic but contributes to the slim, sharp design at the rear of the bike.

The suspension is new and includes the latest fixed-cartridge forks from KYB (formerly Kayaba) and revised rear shock. High-performance Pirelli Supercorsa tyres are fitted as standard. The new switchable ABS system, which weighs just 3lbs., includes a late intervention track setting which allows rear wheel drift.

The ergonomics are altered slightly, with a 10mm reduction in seat height and a little less weight placed on the wrists, but the riding position is still designed for the best control at high speed and on the track.

The new bodywork has a sharper, leaner look that also reflects the higher quality of the new bike. Features such as the deliberately split upper fairing add an air of class, while the attention to detail has moved to a new level and includes a highly attractive upper yoke, machined engine mounting bolts, plugged swingarm mounting plate, a revised cockpit area and quickly detachable number plate/tail-light unit for easy track day conversion.

New lightweight wheels provide lower inertia which assists the speed of turn and the speed of acceleration. It all adds up to a more involved ride.

The comprehensive LCD multi-functional instrument pack features digital speedometer, fuel gauge, trip computer, analog tachometer, lap timer, gear position indicator, programmable gear change lights, and a clock. The unit is able to report tire pressures when Triumph’s accessory Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) is fitted, while switchable ABS (compatible models) can be easily configured via the display.

For added security, an electronic immobilizer is included as standard.

Daytona 675R
Once again the R version of the Daytona adds the very highest specification components to increase its performance focus, as well as sporting a unique look.

Öhlins suspension is fitted, including a TTX rear shock and NIX30 inverted forks, providing the R with a wider range of adjustability, improved response and a firmer base set up.

The latest, lighter Brembo Monobloc calipers are fitted for precise and powerful stopping. Switchable ABS is included as standard, to suit conditions, riding environments and rider preference.

The R comes standard with a quick-shift gear change, improved with new software for 2013.

Stunning carbon fiber cockpit infill panels replace the stock ones, further improving the view from the seat, and a carbon fiber rear hugger is also fitted. Cosmetic changes include a red rear subframe and detailing such as the red wheel pinstripes.

Accessories and Warranty
A wide range of factory accessories are available for the Daytona 675 and Daytona 675R, each designed to enhance both the style and the function of the bikes. The carefully-designed engine, swingarm and frame protectors improve the looks as well as reducing component vulnerability. There’s also a selection of CNC-machined components including brake levers and reservoirs, colored dipsticks and oil filler caps. An approved Arrows silencer is available along with alarms, light luggage and LED indicators. The quick-shift can be added as an option to the stock Daytona 675.

As with all new Triumph motorcycles, the Daytona 675 and Daytona 675R come with an unlimited mileage, two-year factory warranty.

Pricing and Availability
The first public reveal for the 2013 Daytona models will be on November 13th at the EICMA Milan Motorcycle Show. U.S. pricing will be $11,599 for the Daytona 675 and $13,499 for the Daytona 675R. Both models will begin arriving in dealerships this February.

25 Comments

  1. Norm G. says:

    re: “The heart of the new Daytona is its new engine, which brings more performance and a subtly new character, too. The key change is the wider bore and shorter stroke dimensions, allowing a higher 14,400rpm rev limit to gain more power and a broader spread of usable revs. Facilitating this is the new block, separate from the upper crankcase and with ceramic coated aluminum bores so it can be made stronger to cope with the higher pressures. Power is up 2bhp to 126bhp, peaking earlier at 12,600rpm and revving on for longer. The torque maximum is 2ft.lbs higher at 55.3lb.ft, with an increase across the rev range.

    re: “On the intake side are new twin injectors per cylinder, aiding the power and torque gains as well as improving fueling accuracy and efficiency. For the first time, titanium valves are fitted, helping the engine achieve higher revs and allowing Triumph’s engineers room to reshape them to improve gas flow.”

    re: “The transmission features a new slip-assist clutch to provide a lighter lever action and help prevent rear wheel hop under heavy braking. This is aided by the engine management which opens the throttle butterflies to reduce engine braking.”

    somebody’s bringing a gun… to the gun fight…!!! :) btw, none of this was talked about for the street triple. it’s got the new engine also right…?

  2. Agent55 says:

    Not liking to ZX-14 style upper faring, it juts out so far and looks excessive just like the fat Kawi in profile. I’m sure it’ll be a great performer though.

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “Not liking to ZX-14 style upper faring, it juts out so far and looks excessive”

      try to view it as a well endowed woman. “2 zeppelins racin’ in a dead heat”. i hereby proclaim the new 675 B.O.T.Y. 2013.

  3. Delmartian says:

    Please Triumph… how about a liter-bike version!

  4. JB says:

    When did Triumph get bought out by a Japanese company???

    I’m sad to see how “Asian” Triumph has increasingly become with regards to the Daytona design (let alone copying BMW with everything else)… I bought my 2006 Daytona 675 brand new because it was clean, smooth, understated, sleek, curvaceous and somehow elegant — mostly devoid of excessive graphics or farkles. ESPECIALLY not having 50,001 different fonts and colors and stripes and sharp edges and…. I can go on and on…

    I’m happy they FINALLY changed the chassis and engine after 7 damn years, and added switchable ABS and a slipper clutch, though. Quickshifter on the R, too! Though holy crap — $13.5k for a MIDDLEWEIGHT?!?!? This is getting out of hand…

    I’d STILL love to ride one to compare it to my “too much money into it” 2006.

    • Gary says:

      What bike are you looking at??? The Daytona is not even close to being full of excessive graphics or farkles. This is one of the most clean looking sport bikes I’ve seen with the exception of the 2013 Hyosung GTR’s. And so far, Japan has not embraced triples like Triumph. I think this is a great looking bike, my only problem is that dealers are too far away and few inbetween. And if you don’t like the upgraded R, with the 13.5k price, get the standard 675 and enjoy.

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “When did Triumph get bought out by a Japanese company???”

      prolly around the time (mid 80′s) bloor hired ex-kawasaki engineers/designers to rebuild the brand…? there are worse influences than japanese influences. it has been a good thing. there wouldn’t be a modern day triumph if not for them.

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “Though holy crap — $13.5k for a MIDDLEWEIGHT?!?!? This is getting out of hand”

      no, i’m afraid you suffer from a “devaluing mentality” is all. the price of stamps, gas, food, and automobiles aren’t what they were 10 and 20 years ago either.

      nothing special about motorbikes (well, other than the stratospheric entertainment value they return :)) that they would be magically exempt from the same economic forces that can clearly be seen impacting everything else around you.

      • JB says:

        I’m pretty sure the $8,999 MSRP of middleweights from just 6 years ago beg to differ… Cars, stamps and food are NOT 33% more today than 6 years ago. Nothing else but gas has shot up this much in so little time — it’s ridiculous!

        • JB says:

          33%-50% more I should have said.

          • Dave says:

            It’s not $13,5k, it’s $11.5k, the higher price is for a premium version of the bike. The lower priced bike is right in line with the Japanese 600′s, which this bike is superior to in most of the ways that matter to people who ride sport bikes.

            Sure, they’ve gone up but the dollar has fallen by about the same amount since 2007 so there ya’ go..

        • Norm G. says:

          re: “Cars, stamps and food are NOT 33% more today than 6 years ago. Nothing else but gas has shot up this much in so little time — it’s ridiculous!”

          no, what’s ridiculous is the MORE than 33% grin you receive when you put gas in the tank of a 675 and take one for a ride. cars, stamps, and food don’t do any of this. you’ve lost the plot.

          wait, have you ever known the plot…?

  5. Nocklhiem Verstadt says:

    Best looking sport bike available. Kudos to the Brits!

  6. Fangit says:

    The old exhaust was 1000 times sexier.

    • Gutterslob says:

      Underseat pipes are kinda last decade, imho. Unless you’ve got one sticking out the back and another out the side, like the Honda MotoGP bike, then you’re cool again.

      • Fangit says:

        Maybe, but if you’re going to do an under engine exhaust do it properly like the KTM RC8 or Panigale, not something that looks halfway between.

    • DB says:

      The old one may have been sexier, but ride one for about an hour and you’ll have a roasted rump that you’ll feel for three days. I’ll take the new one please:)

    • Norm G. says:

      the old one may have been sexier, but this one will be FASTER. only +2/+2 with the updated engine stock, but should be good for +8 to +10 (easy) in WSS trim when those engine changes are combined with the less restrictive exhaust routing (FISTPUMP!). what you see isn’t cosmetic… it’s pragmatic.

    • DaytonaJames says:

      I so disagree… I had the 09′ Daytona and adapted the low-exit Arrow exhaust that was available for the Street Triple but had to have a new header manifold fabricated (by R.Goldammer) to mate up to the oval-port head of the Daytona. It looked scxy as hell, sounded brilliant and removed so much of the heat from the pipe coming up by your calf. Best full-on sport bike I ever owned.
      Triumph copied me… I want compensation ;-)

  7. allworld says:

    Thank you Triumph. :)

  8. Gutterslob says:

    Very nice. Liking that new R6-esque exhaust. Looks a bit big, but that’s probably just from the photos.

  9. blackcayman says:

    I spent the day on Triumph test bikes at a track day in 2011. The Daytona 675 was by far my favorite for Track Time. I was looking for a nice used example from Sept 2011 through spring of 2012 for 2012 Track Season. I couldn’t find one so I picked up a 2008 Suzuki GSX R750. Its been a great bike and I have been a Suzuki fan for years. It has a great powerband on the track and has been a lot of fun. It just doesn’t have that same “scalpel-like” handling that the Daytona has. The new 675R could be the right bike for me in a few years – I’ll be looking for a nice low miles copy in 2015 or so.
    I like the new low exhaust and the white color scheme is a winner.

  10. drbyers says:

    Me likey…