MotorcycleDaily.com – Motorcycle News, Editorials, Product Reviews and Bike Reviews

Motorcycle News, Editorials, Product Reviews and Bike Reviews

Triumph Announces Details, Specs and Pricing for Redesigned 2016 Speed Triples

012316top-i

The redesigned 2016 Triumph Speed Triples, including the S and R models, were announced last Fall, but detailed specifications and U.S. pricing have not been available until now.

With 104 changes to the 1050cc three-cylinder engine, as well as styling and chassis developments, Triumph seems to have brought the new Speed Triple models squarely into the current, highly competitive naked market arguably started by Triumph more than a decade ago. This is not a fire breather in terms of performance compared to the 1290cc KTM Super Duke R, for instance, but with a claimed 140 horsepower and 83 foot/pounds of torque (both delivered below 10,000 rpm), these bikes should offer plenty of performance for most riders.

Here is the press release from Triumph, including the announcement that the Speed Triple S will carry a U.S. MSRP of $13,200, while the Speed Triple R (with its Öhlins suspension) comes in at $14,900. Expect to see both models in U.S. dealerships by early March of this year.

KEY FEATURES:

  • NEW Speed Triple S and Speed Triple R models deliver heightened performance, capability and character
  • New 1050cc triple engine, with 104 developments to improve peak power and increase torque across the entire rev range
  • Improved drivetrain, featuring a new slip assist clutch
  • Lighter, better sounding, performance-improving exhaust
  • Ride-by-Wire throttle, enabling selectable Rider Modes – 5 in total – and selectable throttle maps
  • Rider-selectable traction control for rain, road, track and off as standard, linked to Rider Modes
  • Athletic aggressive styling including new twin headlights with integral daytime running lights

The new Speed Triple S and Speed Triple R signal a new era for Triumph’s legendary Speed Triple. Designed to be more focused, more powerful, more capable and with more character than any previous generation, these new models redefine the performance roadster segment.

The new Speed Triple S is the entry to the 1050cc performance roadster range while the new Speed Triple R is the new flagship of the Triumph triple-engined roadster range.

These new models retain all the brooding style and minimalist beauty of their predecessors, but add more performance, more capability and more attitude to give the rider maximum fun and maximum thrills.

NEW 1050cc TRIPLE ENGINE

The all-new 1050cc triple engine that powers the new Speed Triple incorporates 104 new developments resulting in an incredibly responsive, free-revving torque-rich power plant. With more torque across the entire rev range and an increase in peak power, the new engine allows the rider to capitalise on the Speed Triple’s incredibly agile chassis with instant response and incredible drive at any revs.

Engine developments include:

• New piston and crankshaft design • New ECU
• New combustion chamber design • Modified cylinder head design
• Increased flow intake ports • New exhaust header design
• New Ride-by-Wire throttle bodies • Re-designed airbox
• Revised fuel system • Smaller, narrower, more efficient radiator

The new fuel delivery system ensures a superior fuel mix to increase combustion performance, while the new header design allows for a larger, denser catalyst with no loss of exhaust flow.

All of these changes have been made with a single aim in mind: to improve the rider experience through delivery of a livelier, more engaging and more involving ride.

NEW DRIVETRAIN

The drivetrain also features a host of developments and features new gear linkages, new balancer gears with new geometry and a new slip assist clutch. In combination, these changes give the rider great shift feel with less lever effort when going through the gears.

FREE-FLOWING EXHAUST SYSTEM

Completing the new engine and drivetrain is a new exhaust system, with silencers that are 70.2% more free flowing and 4.9oz lighter on either side than the previous model. It works in conjunction with the new airbox to reduce emissions, ensure compliance with Euro legislation and importantly increase power. Additionally the new exhaust system amplifies the signature Speed Triple exhaust note – delivering a rich and resonant soundtrack to the ride.

MORE RIDER-FOCUSED TECHNOLOGY

Both new models feature a suite of rider-focused technology designed to maximise rider control and allow the rider to optimise performance to suit the conditions, climate and their riding style.

The new Ride-by-Wire throttle system, working with the new ECU and throttle bodies and featuring selectable throttle maps, gives enhanced throttle control, adding to the feel and responsiveness of the bike and also delivers improved fuel efficiency.

The choice of five different Rider Modes – Rain, Road, Sport, Track and a unique Rider-configurable mode – give the rider distinctly different pre-set combinations of throttle map, ABS and Traction Control settings. The rider configurable mode as its name suggests, allows the rider to individually set all of these performance parameters to suit their own style of riding. They all allow the rider to get the most out of their Speed Triple S or Speed Triple R ride in a wide variety of conditions.

When the Rider-configurable mode is selected the rider has the ability to select their preferred combination of throttle map, ABS and traction control settings. Traction control options are: Rain, Road, Track or Off. Three ABS settings are provided: Road, Track or Off. There are three throttle maps that can be selected to complete the performance personalisation – Rain, Road or Sport.

All of the five Rider Modes are monitored and controlled, along with the engine, through a new ECU, the same unit that is used in the race-winning Triumph Daytona 675.

In addition, the new Speed Triple has a gear position indicator as standard, completing the rider information system.

FOCUSED CHASSIS AND SUSPENSION

Similar focus has been applied to the chassis and suspension of the two new Speed Triple models, heightening the feel that the rider experiences during their ride.

No expense has been spared in giving the new Speed Triple S and Speed Triple R class leading chassis and suspension componentry. Both models feature Brembo M4.32 radial monobloc brakes and fully adjustable suspension as standard, while the Speed Triple R comes with Öhlins NIX30 upside down front forks and an Öhlins TTX36 RSU. The Speed Triple R also features a billet machined handlebar clamp and risers, together with machined swingarm spindle finishers and rear wheel finisher.

012316bottom

STYLED WITH MORE ATTITUDE

In what can be described as a return to the ‘hooligan bike’ looks of the original Speed Triple and echoing the sporty styling of the Daytona 675 and Street Triple RX, the two new models are more focused and assertive in their styling.

They feature striking lines through the fuel tank and tail unit, creating a more hunkered down, aggressive look. Both have a 20mm narrower seat head, giving them improved stand-over and contributing to a lower profile and a more athletic, streamlined look.

The new Speed Triple S and Speed Triple R are instantly recognisable by the new DRL headlights, set low, and integrated with a new fly screen and distinctive intake duct.

The new styling also embraces a sleeker, more sculpted fuel tank, seat, and new bodywork, that includes the front mudguard, tank infills, seat unit, lower profile bar end mirrors, rear bodywork, heel guards and silencer heat shields.

On the Speed Triple R, subtle but high-value differentiators come in the form of carbon fibre front mudguard and tank infills, a new belly pan, Diablo Red rear subframe, red wheel pinstripes and red seat stitching.

LAUNCH TIMINGS

The new Speed Triple S and Speed Triple R will be available in Triumph dealerships late February/ early March 2016. The Speed Triple S will retail for $13,200 and the Speed Triple R retails for $14,900.

SPECIFICATIONS

  Speed Triple S Speed Triple R

 

POWER 140HP @9,500rpm 140HP @ 9,500rpm
TORQUE 82.6 ft-lb @ 7850rpm 82.6 ft-lb @ 7850rpm
ENGINE TYPE Liquid-cooled, in-line, 3 cylinder Liquid-cooled, in-line, 3 cylinder
ENGINE SIZE 1050cc 1050cc
SEAT HEIGHT 32.5 in 32.5 in
FRONT SUSPENSION 43MM USD forks with adjustable preload, rebound and compression damping 43mm Öhlins NIX30 fully adjustable USD front forks with adjustable preload, rebound and compression damping

 

REAR SUSPENSION Showa monoshock with adjustable preload, rebound and compression damping Öhlins TTX36 RSU twin tube monoshock with adjustable preload, rebound and compression damping
FRONT BRAKES Dual 320mm floating disc, 4-piston Brembo radial monobloc calipers Dual 320mm floating disc, 4-piston Brembo radial monobloc calipers
REAR BRAKES Single 255mm disc, single Nissin 2-piston sliding caliper Single 255mm disc, single Nissin 2-piston sliding caliper
TANK CAPACITY 4 Gallons 4 Gallons
DRY WEIGHT 423 lbs. 423 lbs.
COLORS Diablo Red

Phantom Black

Crystal White

Matt Graphite

PRICE $13,200 $14,900
  Standard Equipment

•New triple engine with 104 new components

•Improved peak power and torque spread across entire rev range

•Ride-by-Wire throttle

•5 Rider Modes

•Rider-selectable traction control

•Slip assist clutch

•Switchable ABS

•Switchable traction control

•DRL headlights

•Brembo monobloc calipers

Additional to the Speed Triple S

•Lighter weight carbon fibre body panels

•Higher specification Öhlins suspension

•Billet machined handlebar clamps, risers, swingarm pivot covers and rear wheel cover

•Red ‘R’ detailing on seat stitching, rear subframe and wheel pinstripes


See more of MD’s great photography:

Instagram


52 Comments

  1. rod955i says:

    Looks better than the the 2010 – 2015 model it replaces but it still does not have the presence or in my opinion the desirability of the pre 2010 models. I own a pre 2010 model and I am still waiting for a replacement I actually want to buy. Triumph trashed customers appreciation of the marque when they radically departed from the styling of the pre 2010 models.

  2. Craig says:

    I drove and 1.5 hours to get my Street R in 2012… Dealer 30 minutes away couldn’t match the deal. Not sure if either have Triumph still, but I don’t care… I have my bike, do my own basic service and if I do need the actual dealer, I’ll find one, but don’t care at this point. It’s bullet proof and a good mechanic can work on any bike IMHO.

  3. Neil says:

    Sat on a Speed Trip at a local dealer and it felt top heavy. The Street Trip felt much better. Once you get it moving I am sure it’s fine. The motors are great. Suspension used to be stiff which is the Northeast was tough. 300 lb guy used to do the greatest wheelies up and down the road on one. Effortless. It’s a great machine. But on public roads these things are just getting so overkill. I’m not sure if it’s what we want, all the electronics, or if it’s just necessity over 100 HP. I like the Ducati Monster better. Just seat of the pants judgement. DUC looks better to me.

  4. Econo says:

    We were A Triumph dealer for about 15 years. We dropped them about a year ago. When we picked them up it was a great relationship. We were partners of a sort. Trying to move something that was a great product that no one knew about was tough to say the least. I feel we did a great job for at least 10 years. Then something called “branding” came along about 5 years ago and all began to go downhill very quickly. Triumph’s demands became more menacing with all these programs that we were given the right to OPT OUT of if we did not want to do them. To Opt out of the programs was really just prolonging the end of the relationship. We could have opted into these programs and passed the ridiculous cost on to the customers but that is not what we signed up for. I miss selling the bikes but I am NOT sorry at all that they are gone.Triumph is not Harley Davidson and never will be. The customers that buy Triumphs, I don’t believe want to deal with that type of dealer. I know several dealers who have dropped them and know more that will. That is the only problem for a New Triumph buyer is finding someone who will be in this for the long haul to be there when support work is needed.

    • teelee says:

      Potential Triumph buyers need to listen what Econo says, if your dealer has not dropped Triumph yet they will. The number to sell per year is 75 plus new Triumphs a year for there system to break even for the dealer. Around 15% of Triumph dealers sell 75 plus units a year so that makes the 85% left struggling with sales and profit. If the dealer examines all things in dollars and cents they will turn Triumph LOOSE. Why buy something that the dealer disapears on. It might as well be a Saab.

      • todd says:

        I had a Saab for my wife’s car previously. We owned it twelve years putting on over 130,000 trouble free miles before trading it for her GTI. Not a single problem. I’d buy a Saab again if I could.

  5. Blackcayman says:

    I’m probably one of three motorcyclists who look at it and say “they could make a great SPORT-tour bike from that”.

    KTM did.

    • SausageCreature says:

      I must be one of the other two then.

      Just lengthen the tail to provide enough space for larger seating, add integrated mounting points for optional hard bags (like the FJ-09, Ninja 1K, etc), bring both sets of pegs down and forward a couple of inches, and add a few different (larger) fly screen options to the catalog. Done.

      • Blackcayman says:

        I want real wind protection too. Please…

        I want a real Hooligan machine, but I want to sit up straight and ride all day long, day after day.

        • Duc Dynasty says:

          SV-1000 naked….add soft luggage and decent wind screen. I do that with the SV-650 but sometimes need more motor. They look great too.

          • Selecter says:

            A HUGE problem with the SV1000 is it was a one-year deal here in the US. And I think they sold 1/3 the naked bikes that year (2003) as they sold the half-faired ones. Now, extrapolate that relative rarity out 13 years after most of them have been totaled or neglected, and you end up with what’s essentially a unicorn. One who wishes to make an SV1000 sport tourer either must have a line on a used one already or is willing to do the S to non-S conversion on their own time and dime.

            I see about one nice SV1000 for sale here in MN per year now – some years I see none. I see probably twelve to fifteen SV1000Ses.

            The Tuono is actually more common here than either by a longshot! Funny, that.

    • todd says:

      Tiger 1050? I enjoyed the one I rode but the FZ-1 was more… everything.

      • Blackcayman says:

        I’ve done a couple of all days rides on the Tiger 1050 via Eagle Rider. I didn’t care for the stance of the bike. The motor I LOVED but the tallish suspension didn’t add anything and actually made it unrealistic for me.

        I’d look at a Sprint RS based on this Speed Triple though!

        If I wasn’t paying for a new backyard and two college funds, I’d be riding a Motus MST (Maybe the R).

        I think that is the bike for me, I just need one for 10 – 12 K

  6. Ed says:

    Does anyone else get tired of the bug-eyed look? Will there be some form of a retro kit for a single headlight?

    And why only 4 gallons? Why can’t we have 5? What if we want to go on a trip? Does anyone make a sub liter that has some capacity to it? I don’t care if they claim that it do 80 mpg-with any real world cruising would yield around 40.

    • Blackcayman says:

      You might be our 3rd ….. See above thread.

      Maybe it could sprout a Sprint RS revival?

    • Dave says:

      Re: “I don’t care if they claim that it do 80 mpg”

      You won’t see that kind of mileage fro an engine tuned for peak hp. The Honda NC700 is supposed to return ~70mpg. Makes 48hp @ 6,500rpm.

  7. Chad says:

    I don’t know where you’re located but, here in Maine, we just lost our dealership in the Portland area(Maine’s largest city) due to Triumph trying to shove more product down their throat than they could possibly sell. (and that’s just one reason the dealer decided to give up the franchise) I’m not a hater. I own a Bonneville, have owned a number of Sprints and think the product is very good. I was a R.A.T. pack leader back when Triumph supported the packs and I’ve always been an ambassador for the brand. That being said, I’m not feeling a lot of love for Triumph these days. They left the packs high and dry for some reason, and now, taking a page from HDs handbook, they’re trying to eliminate the “small” dealerships and try to have “Boutique” dealerships. Our dealer in the Portland area couldn’t get the demo truck to come even when it was within an hour from the shop. He took on the brand when it was just getting going on the rebirth and stood by while product trickled out the door. Now, over the last few years, Triumph has been trying to shove product down his throat to the point where he had to say no. That leaves us with an hour’s drive north to the only other dealer in the state. This dealer is also a car dealership and probably can absorb the costs now. What happens when he realizes it’s no longer profitable? Triumph corporate has to pull their heads out of their butts and see what’s happening. Triumph is NOT Harley Davidson and they’re not the big four. They need to ratchet things back or dealers are going to be few and far between. That’s not hating, that’s just the sad truth.

    Great Bay Triumph/Ducati/Zero in North Hampton, NH just closed up shop and nobody really knows why. I bought my 2002 Speed Four there back in 03. They were one of the top ranked dealers for Triumph for many years. Not sure what’s going on with Triumph but it doesn’t look good.

    • KenHoward says:

      “Triumph is NOT Harley Davidson…” “They need to ratchet things back.”

      I didn’t think they were trying to be Harley-Davidson. Aren’t they competing more with BMW and Ducati? Doesn’t having only larger dealers to carry an expanded product line make business sense? And, as far as “…it doesn’t look good” – aren’t Triumph’s sales increasing every year? Whatever they’re doing seems to be correct. My tiny local dealer lost or forfeited his franchise, so the nearest dealer is now 25 miles away, but seems like a more-professional, multi-line establishment. I just don’t understand the antipathy toward Triumph. Time marches on, and they seem to be acting like a successful company planning for continued growth.

      • Mike says:

        Ken, having larger dealerships works if you have the sales to support them and 25 miles is a wee bit better than 60 some odd miles. Chad, I hadn’t heard about Great Bay! That blows me away. They were a flagship store if I’ve ever seen one. Back to Ken, as far as sales growing every year, I think that’s going to be history. It’s hard to sell product when there isn’t a dealer in the largest city in the state. I want Triumph to do well Ken. It’s just I’ve seen this play before and it doesn’t end well at all. Maybe I’ll end up with egg on my face but right now, with a good/fair dealer dropping them, folks in this area are going to think twice about buying if another dealership is started.

  8. VForce says:

    Had an ’06 Speedy and loved it. But in 2016 the Speedy has become an endangered species, as Triumph has done a half-assed job keeping it relevant against the KTM Superduke and Aprilia Tuono. The Suzuki GSX has an even better performance per dollar now.

    The ’16 Aprilia Tuono RR is $14,600 (and I am sure you can get a better deal with some moderate haggling). 170 hp and 90 ft. lbs of torque, it rips the Triumph a new one.

    The Factory with Ohlins suspension is $16,299.

    If you want an even better deal, but a leftover ’14-’15 Tuono which still has way more performance for your dollar.

    2016 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
    [Tuono V4 1100 Factory data in brackets]
    ENGINE DOHC 65-degree V-4, four valves per cylinder
    FUEL Unleaded gasoline
    BORE x STROKE 81.0 x 52.3 mm
    TOTAL ENGINE CAPACITY 1077cc
    CLAIMED HORSEPOWER AT CRANKSHAFT 175 hp at 11,000 rpm
    CLAIMED TORQUE AT CRANKSHAFT 89.2 lb.-ft. at 9000 rpm
    FUEL SYSTEM Airbox with front dynamic air intakes
    4 Weber-Marelli 48-mm throttle bodies with 4 injectors and latest generation Ride-by-Wire engine management. Multiple engine maps selectable by the rider with bike in motion: T (Track), S (Sport), R (Race)
    IGNITION Magneti Marelli digital electronic ignition system integrated in engine control system, with one spark plug per cylinder and “stick-coil” type coils
    STARTER Electric
    EXHAUST 4-into-2-into-1 layout, single oxygen sensor, lateral single silencer with ECU-controlled bypass valve and integrated trivalent catalytic converter (Euro 3)
    ALTERNATOR Flywheel-mounted 450W alternator with rare-earth magnets
    LUBRICATION Wet sump lubrication system with oil radiator and two oil pumps (lubrication and cooling)
    GEARBOX 6-speed cassette type gearbox
    1st: 39/15 (2.600)
    2nd: 33/16 (2.063)
    3rd: 34/20 (1.700)
    4th: 32/22 (1.455)
    5th: 34/26 (1.308)
    6th: 33/27 (1.222)
    Gear lever with Aprilia Quick Shift electronic system (AQS)
    CLUTCH Multiplate wet clutch with mechanical slipper system
    PRIMARY DRIVE Straight-cut gears and integrated flexible coupling, drive ratio: 73/44 (1,659)
    SECONDARY DRIVE Chain: Drive ratio: 42/15 (2.8)
    TRACTION MANAGEMENT APRC System (Aprilia Performance Ride Control), which includes Traction Control (ATC), Wheelie Control (AWC), Launch Control (ALC), all of which can be configured and deactivated independently
    CHASSIS Aluminum dual beam chassis with pressed and cast sheet elements
    Sachs steering damper [Öhlins steering damper]
    FRONT SUSPENSION Upside-down “one by one” Sachs fork, 43mm stanchions [Öhlins fork with TIN surface treatment]. Forged aluminum feet for radial caliper mounting. Completely adjustable spring preload and hydraulic compression and rebound damping. Wheel travel: 4.3 in.
    REAR SUSPENSION Double braced aluminum swingarm; mixed low thickness and sheet casting technology
    Sachs monoshock with piggy-back fully adjustable in: spring preload, hydraulics in compression and rebound [Öhlins monoshock with piggy-back, fully adjustable in: spring preload, wheelbase and hydraulic compression and rebound damping. APS progressive linkage. Wheel travel: 5.1 in.
    BRAKES Front: Dual 320mm floating stainless steel discs with lightweight stainless steel rotor with 6 M432 4 32 studs [aluminum flange] Brembo M432 monobloc radial calipers with four 32mm opposing pistons Sintered pads. Axial pump master cylinder and metal braided brake hoses
    Rear: 220mm diameter disc; Brembo floating caliper with two 32mm isolated pistons. Sintered pads. Pump with integrated tank and metal braided hose
    ABS Bosch 9MP, adjustable on 3 maps, featuring RLM strategy and can be disengaged
    WHEEL RIMS Cast aluminum wheels with 3 split-spoke design
    Front: 3.5 x 17 in.
    Rear: 6.0 x 17 in.
    TIRES Radial
    Front: 120/70ZR-17
    Rear: 190/55ZR-17
    SEAT HEIGHT 32.5 in.
    TRAIL 3.9 in.
    STEERING ANGLE 24.7º
    CLAIMED DRY WEIGHT 406 lb.
    FUEL TANK 4.9 gal.

    • todd says:

      Wow, you got a good memory.

    • Dave says:

      Re: ” Triumph has done a half-assed job keeping it relevant against the KTM Superduke and Aprilia Tuono. ”

      Those bikes aren’t relevant, they’re the freakshow behind the big tent. The reason you find great deals on the Aprilia is become nobody wants one.

      Max HP does not equal best ride, no matter how much 10-15 moto journalists enjoy the launch trip.

      • Jeremy in TX says:

        I don’t think horsepower is the reason people refrain from buying Tuonos. I haven’t ridden any of the other bikes in the “freak show” class, but trust me, the Tuono at least is a “best ride” kind of bike. The fact that it makes freaky, stupid power is just icing on the cake.

      • FreddyJ says:

        The Tuono may be a better bike, but it’s just plain ugly. I think the Triumph is a great looking bike, but they could have focused more on reducing the weight, as this would improve every aspect of the ride. I was really impressed how light the KTM 1290 turned out to be.

    • Jeremy in TX says:

      The S3 did go from being head of the class to an also-ran over these past five years. The “new” one still looks a little dated.

      • Dave says:

        I think Triumph succeeds when they avoid the king of the hill game. Think Street Triple and Daytona 675. There’s always a horsepower king but it’s rarelt the best bnike in class and they almost never sell in meaningful numbers.

        • Jeremy in TX says:

          The Daytona 675 is the horsepower king in its class as was the Street Triple until the debut of the Yamaha FZ-09.

          I think it is perfectly fine that they didn’t go chasing the power bar. They are choosing to keep to the class. The Japanese are still playing in that market with the new GSX-S1000, Z1000 (and even the FZ-09 encroaches on that market to some extent.) Except the problem is that the Speed Triple is being out-gunned in the performance department by the Europeans and beaten in the value department by the Japanese. Where does that leave the Speed Triple exactly… competing with itself? That rarely goes well unless the product offer something truly different, and I don’t think the Speed Triple does anymore.

    • saddlebag says:

      On public roads, is there really a difference. They all have ridiculous power to weight ratios. Personally, a top notch suspension would mean more to me than a few HP at the top of the rev range. The way triples deliver power is pretty nice too.

      KTM may be powerful as hell, but it’s ugly as hell too. I’d prefer to own something that doesn’t scar my retinas when I walk in the garage.

    • mickey says:

      Know whats harder to find in my area than a Triumph dealer? An Aprilia dealer. ( or a Ducati, KTM or BMW dealer for that matter…we did just get a Guzzi dealer in the city)

  9. Silver says:

    Remarkable they would keep that heavy, smelly, expensive and outdated underseat exhaust.

  10. teelee says:

    Why would you buy one with Triumph closing dealerships, there goal 4 years ago was to have 275 to 300 dealers nationwide by 2016 but now they have settled for 200 to 225. I know of 2 more dealers dropping Triumph in the next 90 days. Buy one now and not have a dealer next year. Its happening, don’t believe me go ask your dealer how Triumph treats them. Rosen

    • Half Baked says:

      What is your problem with Triumph you never miss an opportunity to complain about what a terrible company they are. You obviously have some personal issue with them so what is it.

      • KenHoward says:

        His local dealer closed, soon after he bought a bike from them, so now he’s upset with Triumph, forever and ever, seemingly to the point of a nervous breakdown. He just can’t let it go.

    • Stuki Moi says:

      You may, like the majority of Americans, be located in an area where Triumph are adding dealers……

      In general, if dealer density is your main buy criteria, get a big4 bike.

    • MGNorge says:

      OK, not sure why I’m responding to this, but here it is. With your personal crusade to dissuade anyone considering buying a Triumph to not do so does get old. I think we get the message. But since you bring it up I suppose it behooves anyone who cares to check things out. But let it go! Not everyone is going to see it the same way or have your experience(s).

      Remember the guy who always chimed in to say that the Hyosung GT250R could beat a Saturn V rocket to the moon while having the best warranty of any bike and parts, any part, were just a phone call away? It gets old. Maybe some recent Triumph owners will drop a line here of a very good experience? Never know!

      • mickey says:

        “Remember the guy who always chimed in to say that the Hyosung GT250R could beat a Saturn V rocket to the moon while having the best warranty of any bike and parts, any part, were just a phone call away? It gets old.”

        oh my that was funny. Good one MGN

      • Delmartian says:

        I still own my 1997 Triumph Daytona T595 (955cc) that I purchased new from one of the three San Diego Triumph dealers 19 years ago. I ride it to work 2 or 3 times every week (25 miles R/T), and absolutely love it. It’s the only vehicle I’ve ever owned that I’ve decided never to sell. Just had the 27,000 mile minor service performed. Nothing beats the sound of a Triumph triple on the boil. My only complaint, one which I’ve been harping on with my dealer for 12+ years now, is that Triumph needs to re-enter the 1000cc sport bike market that they abandoned around 2004. Hey, I know a new Triumph liter-bike can’t compete with the Japanese big Four on pure performance,(or maybe even MV/Ducati/Aprilia for that matter) but I don’t expect it to. Give me 90% of the performance, and the fantastic sound and superior comfort will pull me in. In the meantime, I just absolutely love my Strontium-Yellow Daytona.
        P.S. – I just bought a 2012 BMW K1300S limited edition HP model. Fantastic bike as well, but for different rides.

    • Mike says:

      I don’t know where you’re located but, here in Maine, we just lost our dealership in the Portland area(Maine’s largest city) due to Triumph trying to shove more product down their throat than they could possibly sell. (and that’s just one reason the dealer decided to give up the franchise) I’m not a hater. I own a Bonneville, have owned a number of Sprints and think the product is very good. I was a R.A.T. pack leader back when Triumph supported the packs and I’ve always been an ambassador for the brand. That being said, I’m not feeling a lot of love for Triumph these days. They left the packs high and dry for some reason, and now, taking a page from HDs handbook, they’re trying to eliminate the “small” dealerships and try to have “Boutique” dealerships. Our dealer in the Portland area couldn’t get the demo truck to come even when it was within an hour from the shop. He took on the brand when it was just getting going on the rebirth and stood by while product trickled out the door. Now, over the last few years, Triumph has been trying to shove product down his throat to the point where he had to say no. That leaves us with an hour’s drive north to the only other dealer in the state. This dealer is also a car dealership and probably can absorb the costs now. What happens when he realizes it’s no longer profitable? Triumph corporate has to pull their heads out of their butts and see what’s happening. Triumph is NOT Harley Davidson and they’re not the big four. They need to ratchet things back or dealers are going to be few and far between. That’s not hating, that’s just the sad truth.

      • teelee says:

        Thats pretty sad only 1 dealer in the state, Mike you are spot on with whats going on at Triumph. I have some knowledge of the company. The Brits want control, its that simple. Until there market share goes down even farther than it is and it will, it will not change. In some dealers there are 3 year models in stock with more product being forced down there throat plus clothing-accessiores. You are forced to buy the stuff or you loose margins on the bikes when sold. I like the product as i still have 1 but i will not buy another and I warn other buyers to buy something else because there dealer will drop the brand soon. This is not a Hyosung story but a fact. Rosen

    • todd says:

      There are ten Triumph dealerships within less than two hours of me (more if I ride faster…). I think that’s rather silly and can understand if Triumph decided I could drive 15 minutes to get to a dealer by closing the one ten minutes away. Having a lot of dealerships doesn’t do the brand or dealer any favors. They will have to compete with each other and discount the bikes. Triumph does not want to seem like a discounted brand. Makes lots of sense to me.

    • Duc Dynasty says:

      I think Teelee has a good point. I just checked new bike inventory at the nearby (Chicago suburb) dealer. He shows 61 new Triumph’s in stock. 20 are 2016’s, 33 are new 2015’s and he still has 8, brand-new 2014’s in his inventory. Not sure but I think these are all his – no consignment. What’s his motivation to keep bringing in the forced allotment?

      • VForce says:

        Sadly, that is the case for Triumph dealers around the country.

        The motivation to bring in the allotment was additional flooring for new units ordered, additional flooring for old units, and sometimes additional dealer incentives. But when you look at the risk vs. reward ROI, most dealers are declining bringing in additional units and just working with other dealers if they happen to not have a unit/ color in stock that a customer wants.

  11. proheli says:

    It seems like the hay-day of british motorcycling was sometime in the late 60. That style is what they are good at. To me it has never seemed like the Speed Trip has ever really broken out of that mold. Yes, it now has up spec components and shinier paint, and I’m sure he bike has made some progress, but really it doesn’t look much past the early 80’s. After the Street Trip 675 came out, we all knew that Triumph COULD build a modern motorcycle, now the only question is why WON’T they build modern motorcycles. The Tiger line excluded of course, and the Bonevilles are cute too.

  12. Tom R says:

    “with 104 developments to improve peak power and increase torque across the entire rev range.”

    Were there REALLY 104 things that needed improvement? If so, the previous version must have been a real piece of crap. 🙂

  13. Butch says:

    Still one of the best naked bikes being produced.
    They’re a hoot to ride.