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New Aprilia Tuono V4 1100: The Naked from Hell

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The horsepower wars are in full swing! Aprilia has announced an even nastier Tuono with an additional 100 cc of displacement. The Tuono V4 1100 puts out a claimed 175 hp, and nearly 90 foot/pounds of torque! Here is what Aprilia has to say about this new model:

Tuono V4 1100 is the latest and most spectacular evolution of a sport naked dynasty, born in 2002 out of Aprilia’s intuition to strip down and fit a handlebar on their flagship superbike (which at the time was the V-twin RSV mille), thereby combining all the advantages of a chassis par excellence with the fun of sitting up and dynamic riding. The patriarch of the new “supernaked” category was called the Tuono 1000 R, the first ultra high performance naked.

In 2013 an even more refined and powerful version was introduced: Tuono V4 R ABS which offered the new features which had already been successfully introduced on the second generation RSV4, such as the higher performance engine (170 HP), the revamped and recalibrated aPRC system and a Race ABS system capable of withstanding even the extreme stress of the track.

The know-how acquired in years of victorious competition at top levels and the experience of the Tuono history now allow Aprilia to exceed limits which had previously seemed insurmountable: introducing the new Tuono V4 1100, an exclusive thrill generator and fun in its purest state. New 175 HP engine with a powerful maximum torque of 120 Nm, revamped chassis setup to achieve better agility, fine tuned aPRC, new look, the possibility of connecting your smartphone to the vehicle through the PMP platform and two distinctly outfitted versions (Factory and RR) that have the same, strictly Aprilia character in common.

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29 Comments

  1. Locky says:

    If were talking hp wars than the H2 just kicked everyone to the curb.Aprilia more than any other com. could close up the SF market by taking the DD1200s motor and dropping it in a Shiver.A 1200 Shiver now that makes sense….

  2. falcodoug says:

    Why don’t I have enough money to buy this? Why, Why, Why? Perfect even with the short riding distance. Thought, perhaps my kids don’t need to go to college.:)

  3. Mike says:

    How is this considered a naked bike? It has a fairing almost as big as my old FJ1200?

  4. billy says:

    It’s kinda neat. But except for wheelie contest why would I buy one over the RSV4?

    • Stuki Moi says:

      Easier and more comfortable to ride slow.

      Per extrapolation from Daytone vs Street Triple.

  5. PN says:

    Oh, it’s great the manufacturers keep making bikes faster and more powerful, but who can ride this stuff? I consider myself a better than average rider but I wouldn’t go near a 160+hp litre bike. The industry keeps going upscale and to me that’s a shame. I realize why the manufacturers are doing this, but something is lost when the blue-collar, everyday guy (and gal) origins of motorcycling are fading away. I like simpler machines personally. I don’t need cruise control because I don’t consider riding interstates interesting, and I don’t need no stinkin’ radio. What happened to living in the moment, whatever it is? ABS? Sure. Traction control? Really? Only if I took an adventure bike off road, and nobody does that with a $20K bike anyway.

    • Brinskee says:

      My 1198S makes 170HP but behaves like a kitten most of the time. It’s all about the throttle control. You don’t have to twist it to the stop every time you ride it. But boy oh boy on those occasions you can twist it WFO, look out. That experience is absolutely incredible, and worth the price of admission every time. It’s breathtaking and a deeply moving, wide eyed, heartbeat racing, adrenaline surging, like-nothing-you’ve-ever-felt-before experience. I love the horsepower wars.

  6. Al Pinaweiss says:

    whatever you say about this one, I’d just kindly remind
    you that the engineer that created the V4 in this bike,
    is a former Ferrari engine man.

    this pedigree alone, coupled with the undeniable magic
    this engine produces, is enough to warrant even a 50 miles
    range (of course, if you can afford to have such a ‘weekend-blast-queen’
    bike along other bikes).

    so not practical, perhaps.

    bonkers & erotica – oh yeah.

    • Jeremy in TX says:

      “this pedigree alone, coupled with the undeniable magic
      this engine produces, is enough to warrant even a 50 miles
      range”

      I respectfully disagree.

  7. Brinskee says:

    Seriously considering this one to replace the Speed Triple. What a looker. Loved my old 2001 RSV 1000R Mille. I bet this thing goes like stink. Too much to ask for the Bol d’Or paint job? High foot pegs don’t bother me, neither does the fuel range. I don’t plan on touring on this monster!

    Wonder how much Scuderia will give me on a 2008 Speed Triple for trade? 🙂

  8. Gabe says:

    Everybody wants more power, but what that bike needs is lower footpegs, better fuel economy (maybe with a switchable eco mode) and a larger tank. We could only squeeze 100 miles out of our test unit!

    Maybe I’m just getting old, but I thought it was plenty fast as it was…

    • Buzz says:

      I have to agree with you on this one Gabe.

      I’ve ridden the Tuono a few times and have been greatly tempted but the range is barely better than a damn electric bike.

      I like to do frequent lunch rides to get out of the house but even a short one is going to be about 75 miles for me.

      That being said, my old MV Agusta Brutale 750 got terrible mileage as well.

      It’s quite a feat of engineering to get a small motor to suck so much gas I suppose.

    • Jeremy in TX says:

      Amen. I get slammed a lot for saying it, but how far I can ride a motorcycle before needing to stop for gas is very important to me on anything other than a dedicated track bike.

  9. VLJ says:

    Unbelievable last couple of years for the motorcycle industry. These things are just amazing.

  10. Ken says:

    wow, new aprilia tuono, great bike

  11. Tom says:

    out of everything i’ve seen today I like this bike the best Naked bikes rock!

    • Stuki Moi says:

      Me to! Just about enough bodywork to make it useful on longer highway stints, while still feeling and looking trim enough to be sportbike. Seemingly everyone who have ever experienced the V4 Tuonos seem to love them. This latest one looks much nicer than the earlier ones, too. The seat looks to be designed to be sat on this time, not just hung off. It even looks like the hip point is moved forward a bit, KTM style, to get a more upright position without resorting to controlling the bike with a tiller. Nice, nice, nice, and nice. And the V4; even nicer 🙂 Now, get busy making a middleweight version, for us geezers who like to at least go through the motions of pretending we’re riding our bikes to their potential…

    • Al says:

      Where’s the naked bike?

  12. Neil says:

    Footpegs are too high. Let’s assume that since it is naked then I did not choose the track version. Why do I need my feet tucked under me, which only serves to slide me into the tank? I didn’t like it on my Kawasaki ZR7 either. They should offer an optional footpeg kit. For that kind of money, why do I want to feel uncomfortable after a short while? Sure it’s an amazing machine. It would be fun. But I NEVER see one out on the road. Ever. So if you’re not going to ride it enough to be seen at least once in a while in traffic, why did you buy the thing? Beautiful art though.

    • Dave says:

      Re: “Why do I need my feet tucked under me,”

      Ground/cornering clearance. This is a hyper-sport bike, naked or not. Looks like lowering them will be a limited exercise with the exhaust’s placement too.

      • Neil says:

        Then why not buy the sport version? As the hands come up from sport position, the feet need to go forward and down. Bio mechanics. At least the CB1000R has a decent peg location for where the bars are. I rode my VFR750 15,000 miles in two years. Why? Smart design. It always said, “Take me!” Work. The bank. Night rides. Rain rides. Church rides. Awake in the middle of the night? Can’t wait to ride the VFR, AGAIN! Not with pegs that high. And if I really need to lean that much, it’s called a track and all the MotoGP riders know it. I grew up with an engineer for a father. The pegs, on the street, would be better lower. And frankly if I am going to buy this, then I am buying an FZ09 and with racetech and Ohlins help, making it a better machine.

        • Dave says:

          Re: “Then why not buy the sport version? ”

          Same reason people buy all kinds of things that make less than perfect sense (SUV’s, fashion-trucks, sport bikes), they just want them this way (naked, higher bar).

          Re: ” And frankly if I am going to buy this, then I am buying an FZ09 and with racetech and Ohlins help, making it a better machine.”

          See, you aren’t the target customer for this bike in the 1st place.

    • Norm G. says:

      re: “But I NEVER see one out on the road. Ever. So if you’re not going to ride it enough to be seen at least once in a while in traffic, why did you buy the thing?”

      which comes first…? chicken or the egg…?

      which comes first…? you seeing a guy riding…? or you driving by a local dealer…?

      • Neil says:

        Yeah someone will go by the local dealer and buy it. But as a nation we are not riding enough to make ourselves safer in numbers. We drive to get milk. We drive to the bank. We drive to the train station. We drive to church. If more of us rode, people would look out for us more. We could tag along in a group we met. But all I see are groups of Harleys. THEY ride.

        • Jeremy in TX says:

          “If more of us rode, people would look out for us more.”

          All the extra motorcyclists would probably just make them angrier at us for interrupting their texting when we got stuck in their grill.

          • falcodoug says:

            Have own 2 Aprilia’s, the Falco and 2nd gen Tuono. Rode them to work every week of the year. Only switching to my endure to reset my sense of speed. I must have this bike!

    • Jeremy in TX says:

      I’ve seen a few around here. Haven’t heard anything that sounds better to my ear yet than that V-4 wailing through the gears at full throttle.

      The pegs locations are according to mission requirements. Roomy, comfortable and fast now belong to the Adventure-Sport segment. The Tuono and its sparring partners are designed for throwing down mercilessly while also retaining some decent ability to serve as an everyday bike. The pegs just have to be a little high for the former.

      • Neil says:

        I sat on one and the pegs were track bike high. With trees, guardrails and oncoming traffic, why am I leaned over THAT far? Many who lean over that far on the street are not leaning anywhere anymore. On the CB1100 forum, a number of guys are going down on their new bikes and that is at sane speeds. Many a retired road racer has said they would never ride this way on the street. It’s an exciting machine. But having ridden my brother’s Multistrada 1100 and gotten on the highway EASILY in 3rd at 85, you’re not gonna use this motor and lean angle on the street. And frankly, at Loudon, few things were as exciting as the two stroke 250 race. I saw an Aprilia at full throttle racing at Loudon. It sounded great and it was on a track, just like the KTM I saw and heard at Road Atlanta at a buck seventy on the back straight. What I see overwhelmingly on the roads are CARS, CARS and CARS.

        • Jeremy in TX says:

          You may not use that kind of lean angle on the street (or shouldn’t anyway, but many of these bikes get taped up and used at the track on the weekend. One of my bikes pull double duty, and I have gotten to the point where my skill level has equaled my peg clearance.

          That said, you are right – the Tuono’s pegs are pretty dang high even compared to the other super nakeds I’ve sat on… probably higher than they need to be for anyone not racing World Super Bike or MotoGP.